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5.1h. Imagination (Imagination on PhilPapers)

See also:
Aldrich, Virgil C. (1941). The scientific abuse of the imagination. Journal of Philosophy 38 (10):270-275.   (Google | More links)
Alexander, H. G. (1963). A suggestion concerning empirical foundations of imagination. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 23 (3):427-431.   (Google | More links)
Arnold, Eckhart, The dark side of the force: When computer simulations lead us astray and ``model think'' narrows our imagination --- pre conference draft for the models and simulation conference, Paris, June 12-14 ---.   (Google)
Abstract: This paper is intended as a critical examination of the question of when the use of computer simulations is beneficial to scientific explanations. This objective is pursued in two steps: First, I try to establish clear criteria that simulations must meet in order to be explanatory. Basically, a simulation has explanatory power only if it includes all causally relevant factors of a given empirical configuration and if the simulation delivers stable results within the measurement inaccuracies of the input parameters. If a simulation is not explanatory, it can still be meaningful for exploratory purposes, but only under very restricted conditions. In the second step, I examine a few examples of Axelrod-style simulations as they have been used to understand the evolution of cooperation (Axelrod, Schüßler) and the evolution of the social contract (Skyrms). These simulations do not meet the criteria for explanatory validity and it can be shown, as I believe, that they lead us astray from the scientific problems they have been addressed to solve and at the same time bar our imagination against more conventional but still better approaches
Auspitz, Josiah Lee (1976). Individuality, civility, and theory: The philosophical imagination of Michael Oakeshott. Political Theory 4 (3):261-294.   (Google | More links)
Bartsch, Renate (2002). Consciousness Emerging: The Dynamics of Perception, Imagination, Action, Memory, Thought, and Language. John Benjamins.   (Cited by 2 | Google | More links)
Bates, Jennifer Ann (2010). Hegel and Shakespeare on Moral Imagination. State University of New York Press.   (Google)
Abstract: A Hegelian reading of good and bad luck -- In Shakespearean drama (phen. of spirit, King Lear, Othello, Hamlet, a Midsummer night's dream) -- Tearing the fabric: Hegel's Antigone, Shakespeare's Coriolanus, and kinship-state conflict (phen. of spirit c. 6, Judith Butler's Antigone, Coriolanus) -- Aufhebung and anti-aufhebung: geist and ghosts in Hamlet (phen. of spirit, Hamlet) -- The problem of genius in King Lear: Hegel on the feeling soul and the tragedy of wonder (anthropology and psychology in the encyclopaedia, Philosophy of mind, King Lear) -- Richard II's mirror and the alienation of the Universal Will (of the I that is a We) (Richard II, phen. of spirit c. 5) -- Falstaff and the politics of wit: negative infinite judgment in a culture of alienation (Henry IV parts I & II, phen. of spirit c. 6, philosophy of right) -- Henry V's unchangeableness: his rejection of wit and his posture of virtue reinterpreted in the light of Hegel's theory of virtue (philosophy of right, Henry V) -- Hegel's theory of crime and evil: (re)tracing the rights of the sovereign self (aesthetics, phen. of spirit, phil. of right, Richard II through to Henry V) -- Richard III, Hamlet, Macbeth and Henry V: conscience, hypocrisy, self-deceit and the tragedy of ethical life (phil. of right, Richard III, Hamlet, Macbeth, Henry V) -- Negation of the negative infinite judgment versus sublation of it: punishment vs. pardon (phil. of right, phen. of spirit c. 6 and Henry VIII) -- Universal wit : the absolute theater of identity (phen. of spirit c. 6 and 8, Pericles, the Tempest) -- Absolute infections and their cure (phen. of spirit c. 6, the Winter's tale).
Berghaus, Günter (ed.) (2009). Futurism and the Technological Imagination. Rodopi.   (Google)
Abstract: This volume, Futurism and the Technological Imagination, results from a conference of the International Society for the Study of European Ideas in Helsinki.
Berman, Michael (2006). Imagining bodies: Merleau-ponty's philosophy of imagination. Dialogue 45 (4):771-774.   (Google)
Betterton, Rosemary (2006). Promising monsters: Pregnant bodies, artistic subjectivity, and maternal imagination. Hypatia 21 (1).   (Google)
Abstract: : This paper engages with theories of the monstrous maternal in feminist philosophy to explore how examples of visual art practice by Susan Hiller, Marc Quinn, Alison Lapper, Tracey Emin, and Cindy Sherman disrupt maternal ideals in visual culture through differently imagined body schema. By examining instances of the pregnant body represented in relation to maternal subjectivity, disability, abortion, and "prosthetic" pregnancy, it asks whether the "monstrous" can offer different kinds of figurations of the maternal that acknowledge the agency and potential power of the pregnant subject
Black, Deborah L. (2000). Imagination and estimation: Arabic paradigms and western transformations. Topoi 19 (1).   (Google)
Bonomo, L. Ryan Musgrave (2010). Addams's philosophy of art : Feminist aesthetics and moral imagination at Hull house. In Maurice Hamington (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Jane Addams. Pennsylvania State University Press.   (Google)
Bostar, Leo (1990). The wake of imagination. Toward a postmodern culture, by Richard kearny. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 13 (2):241-246.   (Google)
Brazier, Paul (2007). Baptized imagination: The theology of George MacDonald (ashgate studies in theology, imagination and the arts). By Kerry dearborn. Heythrop Journal 48 (5):840–842.   (Google | More links)
Breazeale, Daniel (1984). Imagination and reflection: Intersubjectivity. Fichte's "grundlage" of 1794. Journal of the History of Philosophy 22 (4).   (Google)
Breckman, Warren & Jay, Martin (eds.) (2009). The Modernist Imagination: Intellectual History and Critical Theory: Essays in Honor of Martin Jay. Berghahn Books.   (Google)
Bronk, Richard (2009). The Romantic Economist: Imagination in Economics. Cambridge University Press.   (Google)
Abstract: Since economies are dynamic processes driven by creativity, social norms, and emotions as well as rational calculation, why do economists largely study them using static equilibrium models and narrow rationalistic assumptions? Economic activity is as much a function of imagination and social sentiments as of the rational optimisation of given preferences and goods. Richard Bronk argues that economists can best model and explain these creative and social aspects of markets by using new structuring assumptions and metaphors derived from the poetry and philosophy of the Romantics. By bridging the divide between literature and science, and between Romanticism and narrow forms of Rationalism, economists can access grounding assumptions, models, and research methods suitable for comprehending the creativity and social dimensions of economic activity. This is a guide to how economists and other social scientists can broaden their analytical repertoire to encompass the vital role of sentiments, language, and imagination
Callaway, H. G. (2007). Emerson and Santayana on Imagination. In Flamm and Skowronski (ed.), Under Any Sky, Contemporary Readings on George Santayana.   (Google)
Abstract: This paper examines Santayana on imagination, and related themes, chiefly as these are expressed in his early work, Interpretations of Poetry and Religion (1900). My hypothesis is that Santayana under-estimates, in this book, the force and significance of the prevalent distinction between imagination and fancy, as this was originally put forward by Coleridge and later developed in Emerson’s late essays. I will focus on some of those aspects of Santayana’s book which appear to react to or to engage with Emerson’s views and aim to bring Santayana’s treatment of the theme of imagination into relation with Emerson. Understanding the differences in greater detail we stand a better chance of reasoned evaluation of alternative conceptions of imagination. I will argue that the Coleridge-Emersonian conception of the distinction between imagination and fancy is a crucial element of the background of Peircean abduction, and in this fashion, contributes to the continuity of Emerson’s writings with the pragmatist tradition.
Caplan, Ben (ms). Creatures of fiction, myth, and imagination.   (Google)
Abstract: In the nineteenth century, astronomers thought that a planet between Mercury and the Sun was causing perturbations in the orbit of Mercury, and they introduced ‘Vulcan’ as a name for such a planet. But they were wrong: there was, and is, no intra-Mercurial planet. Still, these astronomers went around saying things like (2) Vulcan is a planet between Mercury and the Sun. Some philosophers think that, when nineteenth-century astronomers were theorizing about an intra-Mercurial planet, they created a hypothetical planet
Chappell, Tim (2009). Douglas Hedley living forms of the imagination . (London: T. & T. Clark, 2008). Pp. X+308. £65.00 (hbk); £24.99 (pbk). Isbn 0567032949 (hbk); 0567032957 (pbk). Religious Studies 45 (2):241-247.   (Google)
Chakrabarty, Dipesh (1999). Nation and imagination: The training of the eye in bengali modernity. Topoi 18 (1).   (Google)
Chiari, Joseph (1970). Realism and Imagination. New York,Gordian Press.   (Google)
Clack, Beverley (forthcoming). After Freud: Phantasy and imagination in the philosophy of religion. Philosophy Compass.   (Google)
Clapp, Elsie Ripley (1909). Dependence upon imagination of the subject-object distinction. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 6 (17):455-460.   (Google | More links)
Clarkson, Austin (2008). The dialectical mind : On educating the creative imagination in elementary school. In Raya A. Jones (ed.), Education and Imagination: Post-Jungian Perspectives. Routledge.   (Google)
Coeckelbergh, Mark & Wackers, Ger (2007). Imagination, distributed responsibility and vulnerable technological systems: The case of Snorre a. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (2).   (Google)
Abstract:  An influential approach to engineering ethics is based on codes of ethics and the application of moral principles by individual practitioners. However, to better understand the ethical problems of complex technological systems and the moral reasoning involved in such contexts, we need other tools as well. In this article, we consider the role of imagination and develop a concept of distributed responsibility in order to capture a broader range of human abilities and dimensions of moral responsibility. We show that in the case of Snorre A, a near-disaster with an oil and gas production installation, imagination played a crucial and morally relevant role in how the crew coped with the crisis. For example, we discuss the role of scenarios and images in the moral reasoning and discussion of the platform crew in coping with the crisis. Moreover, we argue that responsibility for increased system vulnerability, turning an undesired event into a near-disaster, should not be ascribed exclusively, for example to individual engineers alone, but should be understood as distributed between various actors, levels and times. We conclude that both managers and engineers need imagination to transcend their disciplinary perspectives in order to improve the robustness of their organisations and to be better prepared for crisis situations. We recommend that education and training programmes should be transformed accordingly
Cole, David J. (2003). Gerald Edelman and Giulio tononi, a universe of consciousness: How matter becomes imagination, new York: Basic books, 2000, XIII+ 274 pp., $17.00 (paper), ISBN 0-465-01377-. Minds and Machines 13 (3).   (Google)
Collier, Mark (2010). Hume's Theory of Moral Imagination. History of Philosophy Quarterly 27 (3):255-273.   (Google)
Abstract: David Hume endorses three claims that are difficult to reconcile: (1) sympathy with those in distress is sufficient to produce compassion towards their plight, (2) adopting the general point of view often requires us to sympathize with the pain and suffering of distant strangers, but (3) our care and concern is limited to those in our close circle. Hume manages to resolve this tension, however, by distinguishing two types of sympathy. We feel compassion towards those around us because associative sympathy causes us to mirror their pain and suffering, but our ability to enter into the afflictions of those remote from us involves cognitive sympathy and merely requires us to reflect upon how we would feel in their shoes. This hybrid theory of sympathy receives support from recent work on affective mirroring and cognitive pretense. Hume’s account should appeal to contemporary researchers, therefore, who are interested in the nature of moral imagination.
Cole, Jonathan (2005). Imagination after neurological losses of movement and sensation: The experience of spinal cord injury. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (2).   (Google)
Abstract:   To what extent is imagination dependent on embodied experience? In attempting to answer such questions I consider the experiences of those who have to come to terms with altered neurological function, namely those with spinal cord injury at the neck. These people have each lost all sensation and movement below the neck. How might these new ways of living affect their imagination?
Collingwood, R. G. (1935). The Historical Imagination. Oxford, the Clarendon Press.   (Google)
Connolly, William E. (1997). Debate: Reworking the democratic imagination. Journal of Political Philosophy 5 (2):194–202.   (Google | More links)
Cook, Patricia (ed.) (1993). Philosophical Imagination and Cultural Memory: Appropriating Historical Traditions. Duke University Press.   (Google)
Cooey, Paula M. (1994). Religious Imagination and the Body: A Feminist Analysis. Oxford University Press.   (Google)
Abstract: In recent years feminist scholarship has increasingly focused on the importance of the body and its representations in virtually every social, cultural, and intellectual context. Many have argued that because women are more closely identified with their bodies, they have access to privileged and different kinds of knowledge than men. In this landmark new book, Paula Cooey offers a different perspective on the significance of the body in the context of religious life and practice. Building on the pathbreaking work of Elaine Scarry in The Body in Pain, Cooey looks at a wide range of evidence, from the Argentine prison narrative of Alicia Partnoy, to the novels of Toni Morrison and the paintings of Frida Kahlo. Drawing on current social theory and critique, cognitive psychology, contemporary fiction and art, and women's accounts of religious experience, Cooey relates the reality of sentience to the social construction of reality. Beginning with an examination of the female body as a metaphor for alternative knowledge, she considers the significance of physical pain and pleasure to the religious imagination, and the relations between sentience, sensuality, and female subjectivity. Cooey succeeds in bringing forward a sophisticated new understanding of the religious importance of the body, at the same time laying the foundations of a feminist theory of religion
Corbin, Henry (1998). Alone with the Alone: Creative Imagination in the Ṣūfism of Ibn ʻarabī. Princeton University Press.   (Google)
Abstract: "Henry Corbin's works are the best guide to the visionary tradition.... Corbin, like Scholem and Jonas, is remembered as a scholar of genius. He was uniquely equipped not only to recover Iranian Sufism for the West, but also to defend the principal Western traditions of esoteric spirituality."--From the introduction by Harold Bloom Ibn 'Arabi (1165-1240) was one of the great mystics of all time. Through the richness of his personal experience and the constructive power of his intellect, he made a unique contribution to Shi'ite Sufism. In this book, which features a powerful new preface by Harold Bloom, Henry Corbin brings us to the very core of this movement with a penetrating analysis of Ibn 'Arabi's life and doctrines. Corbin begins with a kind of spiritual topography of the twelfth century, emphasizing the differences between exoteric and esoteric forms of Islam. He also relates Islamic mysticism to mystical thought in the West. The remainder of the book is devoted to two complementary essays: on "Sympathy and Theosophy" and "Creative Imagination and Creative Prayer." A section of notes and appendices includes original translations of numerous Su fi treatises. Harold Bloom's preface links Sufi mysticism with Shakespeare's visionary dramas and high tragedies, such as The Tempest and Hamlet . These works, he writes, intermix the empirical world with a transcendent element. Bloom shows us that this Shakespearean cosmos is analogous to Corbin's "Imaginal Realm" of the Sufis, the place of soul or souls
Corbin, Henry (1970). Creative Imagination in the Sūfism of Ibn ʻarabi. London, Routledge & K. Paul.   (Google)
Corbin, Henry (1969). Creative Imagination in the Ṣūfism of Ibn ʻarabī. [Princeton, N.J.]Princeton University Press.   (Google)
Abstract: A penetrating analysis of the life and doctrines of the Spanish-born Arab theologian
Courtney, Richard (1971). Imagination and the dramatic act: Comments on Sartre, Ryle, and Furlong. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 30 (2):163-170.   (Google | More links)
Coward, L. Andrew & Sun, Ron (2001). A Universe of Consciousness: How Matter Becomes Imagination. Basic Books.   (Google)
Cutrofello, Andrew (1998). Speculative imagination and the problem of legitimation: On David Ingram's reason, history, and politics: The communitarian grounds of legitimation in the modern age. Social Epistemology 12 (2):117 – 126.   (Google | More links)
Davies, Arthur Ernest (1907). Imagination and thought in human knowledge. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 4 (24):645-655.   (Google | More links)
Dean-Jones, Lesley (2007). In the grip of disease: Studies in the greek imagination, by G.e.R. Lloyd. Ancient Philosophy 27 (1):205-208.   (Google)
Dennett, Daniel C. (1990). Artificial life: A feast for the imagination. Biology and Philosophy 5 (4).   (Google)
Dickins, Thomas E. & Dickins, David W. (2002). Is empirical imagination a constraint on adaptationist theory construction? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):515-516.   (Google)
Abstract: Andrews et al. present a form of instrumental adaptationism that is designed to test the hypothesis that a given trait is an adaptation. This epistemological commitment aims to make clear statements about behavioural natural kinds. The instrumental logic is sound, but it is the limits of our empirical imagination that can cause problems for theory construction
Dooley, Mark (2007). Truth, ethics, and narrative imagination: Kearney and the postmodern challenge. In Peter Gratton, John Panteleimon Manoussakis & Richard Kearney (eds.), Traversing the Imaginary: Richard Kearney and the Postmodern Challenge. Northwestern University Press.   (Google)
Dorsch, Fabian, Moran on imagination and fictional emotions.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: One of the central concerns of Moran's essay The Expression of Feeling in Imagination1 is to address the problem of fictional emotions - that is, of our emotional responses towards fictional characters, situations or events – and to clarify whether it is essentially related to some form of imagining or another.2 Moran's specific aim is thereby to criticise Walton's solution to the problem in terms of (as it seems) propositional imagining, and to present his own alternative account in terms of emotional imagining. In this paper, I will primarily be concerned with the question of whether he has succeeded in this aim. But I intend also to briefly introduce and discuss towards the end a third approach to the problem and, especially, to the issue of whether imagining plays a central role in the occurrence of fictional emotions
Ebenreck, Sara (1996). Opening pandora's box: The role of imagination in environmental ethics. Environmental Ethics 18 (1):3-18.   (Google)
Abstract: While the activity of imagination is present in much writing about environmental ethics, little direct attention has been given to clarifying its role. Both its significant presence and provocative theoretical work showing the central role of imagination in ethics suggest a need for discussion of its contributions. Environmental ethicists especially should attend to imagination because of the pervasive influence of metaphorical constructs of nature and because imaginative work is required to even partially envision the perspective of a nonhuman being. Without clear awareness of the limits of contemporary Western metaphoric constructs of nature, environmental ethicists may overlook or even contribute to the cultural extinction of ideas of nature present in the imaginative visions of indigenous cultures. In this article, I briefly review the reasons why the dominant Western philosophical tradition ranks imagination below the power of abstract reasoning, survey contemporary ideas about the role of imagination in ethics, and consider the implications of these ideas for environmental ethics. The work of imaginative empathy in constructing what might be the experience of nonhuman beings, the role of diverse metaphors and symbols in understanding nature, and the process of envisioning the possible future are developed as three central contributions of imagination to environmental ethics. Imaginative work is not peripheral, butcomplementary to the work of reason in shaping an environmental ethic
Edelman, Gerald M. & Tononi, Giulio (2000). A Universe of Consciousness: How Matter Becomes Imagination. Basic Books.   (Cited by 701 | Google | More links)
Edman, Irwin (1928). Religion and the philosophical imagination. Journal of Philosophy 25 (25):673-685.   (Google | More links)
Egan, Kieran & Judson, Gillian (2009). Values and imagination in teaching: With a special focus on social studies. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (2):126-140.   (Google)
Abstract: Both local and global issues are typically dealt with in the Social Studies curriculum, or in curriculum areas with other names but similar intents. In the literature about Social Studies the imagination has played little role, and consequently it hardly appears in texts designed to help teachers plan and implement Social Studies lessons. What is true of Social Studies is also largely reflected in general texts concerning planning teaching. Clearly many theorists and practitioners are concerned to engage students' imaginations in learning, even though they use terms other than 'imagination' in doing so. This article suggests that a more explicit attention to imagination can make our efforts to engage students in learning more effective. We provide, first, a working definition of imagination, then show how students' imaginations can be characterized in terms of the 'cognitive toolkits' they bring to learning. We look at such 'cognitive tools' as stories, images, humor, binary oppositions, a sense of mystery and how these can be used to engage students' imaginations in learning Social Studies and other content from kindergarten to about grade four. We then consider 'cognitive tools' commonly deployed by students from about grade four to grade nine, including a sense of reality, the extremes of experience and limits of reality, and associating with the heroic. We also provide examples of how using such tools could influence planning and teaching Social Studies topics
Elders, Fons (2001). The Sublime and the Beautiful on Ontology and Creative Imagination. Vub University Press.   (Google)
Elliott, George Roy (1938). Humanism and Imagination. Port Washington, N.Y.,Kennikat Press.   (Google)
Elliott, Anthony (2009). Identity, identification, imagination: Psychoanalysis and modern european thought after the postmodern turn. In Roger Frie & Donna M. Orange (eds.), Beyond Postmodernism: New Dimensions in Theory and Practice. Routledge.   (Google)
Elpidorou, Andreas (2010). Imagination in Non-representational Painting. In Jonathan Webber (ed.), Reading Sartre: On Phenomenology and Existentialism. Routledge.   (Google | More links)
Engell, James (1981). The Creative Imagination: Enlightenment to Romanticism. Harvard University Press.   (Google)
Ferreira, M. Jamie (1989). Repetition, concreteness, and imagination. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 25 (1).   (Google)
Finn, Christine (2001). Outside Archaeology: Material Culture and Poetic Imagination. British Archaeological Reports.   (Google)
Fiocco, M. Oreste (2007). Conceivability, imagination and modal knowledge. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (2):364-380.   (Google)
Abstract: The notion of conceivability has traditionally been regarded as crucial to an account of modal knowledge. Despite its importance to modal epistemology, there is no received explication of conceivability. One purpose of this paper is to argue that the notion is not fruitfully explicated in terms of the imagination. The most natural way of presenting a notion of conceivability qua imaginability is open to cogent criticism. In order to avoid such criticism, an advocate of the modal insightfulness of the imagination must broaden the idea of what it is to be imaginable. I argue that this required broadening renders the imagination idle (in this context). Consequently, I distinguish two different accounts of the evidential basis of modal knowledge and present a more general argument that concludes that the very notion of conceivability should be eschewed in modal epistemology
Flew, Antony G. N. (1956). Facts and 'imagination'. Mind 65 (July):392-399.   (Google | More links)
Forsyth, Dan W. (1998). Ajātasattu and the future of psychoanalytic anthropology. Part III: Culture, imagination, and the wish. International Journal of Hindu Studies 2 (1).   (Google)
Frasca-Spada, (2005). Quixotic confusions and Hume's imagination. In Marina Frasca-Spada & P. J. E. Kail (eds.), Impressions of Hume. Oxford University Press.   (Google)
Gleckner, Robert F. (1956). Blake's religion of imagination. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 14 (3):359-369.   (Google | More links)
Gottlieb, Gabriel A. (2007). Kant and the power of imagination. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 28 (2):189-194.   (Google)
Grassi, Paola (2009). Adam and the serpent : Everyman and the imagination. In Moira Gatens (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Benedict Spinoza. Pennsylvania State University Press.   (Google)
Greene, Maxine (2008). Art and imagination : Reclaiming the sense of possibility. In Alexandra Miletta & Maureen McCann Miletta (eds.), Classroom Conversations: A Collection of Classics for Parents and Teachers. The New Press.   (Google)
Gregory, Joshua C. (1921). Realism and imagination. Mind 30 (119):303-312.   (Google | More links)
Griswold Jr, Charles L. (2006). Imagination : Morals, science, arts. In Knud Haakonssen (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Adam Smith. Cambridge University Press.   (Google)
Grush, Rick (ms). Manifolds, coordinations, imagination, objectivity.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: Each of us distinguishes between himself and states of himself on the one hand, and what is not himself or a state of himself on the other. What are the conditions of our making this distinction, and how are they fulfilled? In what way do we make it, and why do we make it in the way we do?
Gutmann, James (1919). Imagination as a factor towards truth. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 16 (3):57-71.   (Google | More links)
Halle, Louis Joseph (1972). The Ideological Imagination: Ideological Conflict in Our Time and its Roots in Hobbes, Rousseau and Marx. Quadrangle Books.   (Google)
Hammond, David M. (1988). Imagination in Newman's phenomenology of cognition. Heythrop Journal 29 (1):21–32.   (Google | More links)
Hanson, R. P. C. (1976). Mystery and Imagination: Reflections on Christianity. Spck.   (Google)
Hannam, Patricia (2009). Philosophy with Teenagers: Nurturing a Moral Imagination for the 21st Century. Network Continuum.   (Google)
Harris, Erdman (1959). God's Image and Man's Imagination. New York, Scribner.   (Google)
Harpur, Patrick (2002). The Philosophers' Secret Fire: A History of the Imagination. Ivan R. Dee.   (Google)
Hegarty, James M. (2009). On platial imagination in the sanskrit mahābhārata. International Journal of Hindu Studies 13 (2):163-187.   (Google)
Hopkins, Robert (2010). Imagination and affective response. In Jonathan Webber (ed.), Reading Sartre: On Phenomenology and Existentialism. Routledge.   (Google)
Hüppauf, Bernd-Rüdiger & Wulf, Christoph (eds.) (2009). Dynamics and Performativity of Imagination: The Image Between the Visible and the Invisible. Routledge.   (Google)
Huxley, Julian (ed.) (1965). The Doubleday Pictorial Library of Growth of Ideas: Knowledge, Thought, Imagination. Garden City, N.Y.,Doubleday.   (Google)
Ihde, Don (2006). The designer fallacy and technological imagination. In John R. Dakers (ed.), Defining Technological Literacy: Towards an Epistemological Framework. Palgrave Macmillan.   (Google)
Iheoma, Eugene O. (1993). Vico, imagination and education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 27 (1):45–55.   (Google | More links)
Ishiguro, Hilde (1966). Imagination. In British Analytical Philosophy. London,: Routledge & K Paul,.   (Cited by 6 | Google)
Jackson, Kevin T. (1999). Spirituality as a foundation for freedom and creative imagination in international business ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 19 (1).   (Google)
Abstract: Spirituality, in the broad sense, provides a deeper foundation for principles of international business ethics than legalistic, command-based ethics programs. Spiritual-based principles and values are presupposed and endorsed by established legal and ethical principles for international business. Identifying such spiritual-based principles and values requires the exercise of moral imagination and an openness to values embraced by the world's religions. Once identified, a new realm of moral freedom is attained for multinational corporations which may help them move beyond an "ethics for sale" orientation
Janz, B. (online). Making a scene: Place-making imagination, artistic production, and narratives in urban space.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: INVENT-L Conference, UF, Gainesville, FL, 22-24 February 2007)
Jansen, Julia (2005). On the development of Husserl's transcendental phenomenology of imagination and its use for interdisciplinary research. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (2).   (Google)
Abstract:   In this paper I trace Husserl’s transformation of his notion of phantasy from its strong leanings towards empiricism into a transcendental phenomenology of imagination. Rejecting the view that this account is only more incompatible with contemporary neuroscientific research, I instead claim that the transcendental suspension of naturalistic (or scientific) pretensions precisely enables cooperation between the two distinct realms of phenomenology and science. In particular, a transcendental account of phantasy can disclose the specific accomplishments of imagination without prematurely deciding upon a particular scientific paradigm for its experimental investigation; a decision that is best left to the sciences themselves
Randall Jr, John Herman (1954). George Santayana--naturalizing the imagination. Journal of Philosophy 51 (2):50-52.   (Google | More links)
Jorgensen, Estelle Ruth (2006). "This-with-that": A dialectical approach to teaching for musical imagination. Journal of Aesthetic Education 40 (4).   (Google)
Judson, Lindsay (1991). Mind and imagination in Aristotle. Ancient Philosophy 11 (2):434-439.   (Google)
Kaag, John (2009). The neurological dynamics of the imagination. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (2).   (Google)
Abstract: This article examines the imagination by way of various studies in cognitive science. It opens by examining the neural correlates of bodily metaphors. It assumes a basic knowledge of metaphor studies, or the primary finding that has emerged from this field: that large swathes of human conceptualization are structured by bodily relations. I examine the neural correlates of metaphor, concentrating on the relation between the sensory motor cortices and linguistic conceptualization. This discussion, however, leaves many questions unanswered. If it is the case that the sensory motor cortices are appropriated in language acquisition, how does this process occur at the neural level? What neural preconditions exist such that this appropriation is possible? It is with these questions in mind that I will turn my attention to studies of neural plasticity, degeneracy and the mirror neuron activation. Whereas some scholarship in philosophy and cognitive neuroscience has aimed to identify the neurological correlates of consciousness, examining plasticity, degeneracy and activation shifts the discussion away from a study of correlates toward an exploration of the neurological dynamics of thought. This shift seems appropriate if we are to examine the processes of the “imagination.”
Kallen, Horace Meyer (1973). Creativity, Imagination, Logic. New York,Gordon and Breach.   (Google)
Kearney, Richard (1995). Poetics of Modernity: Toward a Hermeneutic Imagination. Humanities Press.   (Google)
Kearney, Richard (1988). Paul Ricoeur and the hermeneutic imagination. Philosophy and Social Criticism 14 (2).   (Google)
Keyser, Cassius J. (1911). The asymmetry of the imagination. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 8 (12):309-316.   (Google | More links)
Kilwardby, Robert (1987). On Time and Imagination =. Published for the British Academy by the Oxford University Press.   (Google)
Abstract: The second volume in this series devoted to the writings of the English Dominican Robert Kilwardby, this work presents the Latin text of two Oxford treatises from the 1250s--one on time, the other on imagination. The treatise on time discusses its reality, connection with change, unity and beginning, the instant and time's relationship to eternity; the one on imagination examines the way imagery is acquired, retained and transmitted, and the relation between heart and head in the workings of common sense
Kirkman, Robert (2008). Failures of imagination: Stuck and out of luck in the american metropolis. Ethics, Place and Environment 11 (1):17 – 32.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: Ethical choice and action in the built environment are complicated by the fact that moral agents often get stuck as they pursue their goals. A common way of getting stuck has its roots in human cognition: the failure of moral imagination, which shows most clearly when moral agents stand on either side of a sharp cultural divide, like the traditional divide between city and suburb. Being stuck is akin to bad moral luck: it is a situation beyond the control of the moral agent for which that agent might nevertheless be held responsible
Klein, Jürgen; Damm, Vera & Giebeler, Angelika (1983). An outline of a theory of imagination. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 14 (1).   (Google)
Kooij, Suzanne (2004). Poetic imagination and the paradigm of painting. In Lodi Nauta & Detlev Pätzold (eds.), Imagination in the Later Middle Ages and Early Modern Times. Peeters.   (Google)
Kroner, Richard (1941). The Religious Function of Imagination. London, H. Milford, Oxford University Press.   (Google)
Kwon, Jung-In (2005). Imagination and the meaningful brain. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (3).   (Google)
Jean-Louis Labarrière, (1984). Imagination humaine et imagination animale chez aristote. Phronesis 29 (1):17-49.   (Google)
La Forge, Paul G. (2004). Cultivating moral imagination through meditation. Journal of Business Ethics 51 (1).   (Google)
Abstract: The purpose of this article is to show how moral imagination can be cultivated through meditation. Moral imagination was conceived as a three-stage process of ethical development. The first stage is reproductive imagination, that involves attaining awareness of the contextual factors that affect perception of a moral problem. The second stage, productive imagination, consists of reframing the problem from different perspectives. The third stage, creative imagination, entails developing morally acceptable alternatives to solve the ethical problem. This article contends that moral imagination can be cultivated through three kinds of meditation: non-discursive, semidiscursive, and discursive meditation. Part one shows how the seed of reproductive moral imagination is planted during sessions of nondiscursive meditation. Productive moral imagination, as will be shown in part two, is nurtured through semidiscursive meditation. Part three will demonstrate the flowering of creative moral imagination through discursive meditation. Reflection and small group discussion on each form of meditation will help to show business people how to cultivate moral imagination
Laurens, Stéphane (2007). Social influence: Representation, imagination and facts. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (4):401–413.   (Google | More links)
Levi, Albert William (1962). Literature, Philosophy & the Imagination. Bloomington, Indiana University Press.   (Google)
Lloyd, Genevieve (2000). No one's land: Australia and the philosophical imagination. Hypatia 15 (2).   (Google)
Abstract: : Drawing on the work of Michèle Le Dœuff, this paper uses the idea of "philosophical imagination" to make visible the historical intersection between philosophical ideas, social practice, and institutional structures. It explores the role of ideas of "terra nullius" and of the "doomed race" in the formation of some crucial ways in which non-indigenous Australians have imagined their relations with indigenous peoples. The author shows how feminist reading strategies that attend to the imaginary open up ways of rethinking processes of inclusion and exclusion
Loftus, Elizabeth (ms). Imagination inflation: Imagining a childhood event inflates confidence that it occurred.   (Google)
Abstract: Counterfactual imaginings are known to have far reaching implications. In the present experiment, we ask if imagining events from one's past can affect memory for childhood events. We draw on the social psychology literature showing that imagining a future event increases the subjective likelihood that the event will occur. The concepts of cognitive availability and the source monitoring framework provide reasons to expect that imagination may inflate confidence that a childhood event occurred. However, people routinely produce myriad counterfactual imaginings (i.e., daydreams and fantasies) but usually do not confuse them with past experiences. To determine the effects of imagining a childhood event, we pretested subjects on how confident they were that a number of childhood events had happened, asked them to imagine some of those events, and then gathered new confidence measures. For each of the target items, imagination inflated confidence that the event had occurred in childhood. We discuss implications for situations in which imagination is used as an aid in searching for presumably lost memories
Lohmar, Dieter (2005). On the function of weak phantasmata in perception: Phenomenological, psychological and neurological clues for the transcendental function of imagination in perception. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (2).   (Google)
Abstract:   Weak phantasmata have a decisive and specifically transcendental function in our everyday perception. This paper provides several different arguments for this claim based on evidence from both empirical psychology and phenomenology
Long, Christopher P. (1998). Two powers, one ability: The understanding and imagination in Kant's critical philosophy. Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (2):233-253.   (Google)
Lovibond, Sabina (1983). Realism and Imagination in Ethics. B. Blackwell.   (Google)
Lyons, John D. (2005). Before Imagination: Embodied Thought From Montaigne to Rousseau. Stanford University Press.   (Google)
Abstract: Before imagination became the transcendent and creative faculty promoted by the Romantics, it was for something quite different. Not reserved to a privileged few, imagination was instead considered a universal ability that each person could direct in practical ways. To imagine something meant to form in the mind a replica of a thing—its taste, its sound, and other physical attributes. At the end of the Renaissance, there was a movement to encourage individuals to develop their ability to imagine vividly. Within their private mental space, a space of embodied, sensual thought, they could meditate, pray, or philosophize. Gradually, confidence in the self-directed imagination fell out of favor and was replaced by the belief that the few—an elite of writers and teachers—should control the imagination of the many. This book seeks to understand what imagination meant in early modern Europe, particularly in early modern France, before the Romantic era gave the term its modern meaning. The author explores the themes surrounding early modern notions of imagination (including hostility to imagination) through the writings of such figures as Descartes, Montaigne, François de Sales, Pascal, the Marquise de Se;vigne;, Madame de Lafayette, and Fe;nelon
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McCarthy, Cameron & Dimitriadis, Greg (2004). Postcolonial literature and the curricular imagination: Wilson Harris and the pedagogical implications of the carnivalesque. Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (2):201–213.   (Google | More links)
McDonald, Christie (2010). On the ethnographic imagination in the eighteenth century. In Christie McDonald & Susan Rubin Suleiman (eds.), French Global: A New Approach to Literary History. Columbia University Press.   (Google)
McGinn, Marie (2010). Wittgenstein's private language: Grammar, nonsense, and imagination in philosophical investigations, §§243-315 (review). Philosophy and Literature 34 (1):pp. 265-269.   (Google)
McIntyre, John (1987). Faith, Theology, and Imagination. Handsel Press.   (Google)
McLean, George F. & Knowles, Richard T. (eds.) (2003). Moral Imagination in Personal Formation and Character Development. Council for Research in Values and Philosophy.   (Google)
McManus, Susan (2005). Fictive Theories: Towards a Deconstructive and Utopian Political Imagination. Palgrave Macmillan.   (Google)
Abstract: Tracing the fictions that lie at the core of political theory's attempts to ground itself in nature, truth or knowledge of the real opens the space for a new mode of political theorizing. This new mode of (self-consciously) fictive theorizing has, McManus argues, both epistemological and ethical advantages. Methodologically reflexive, part epistemological critique, and part political manifesto, this book unfolds a creative epistemology of the possible, a utopian and deconstructive mode of political theory which moves beyond a politics based on legislative drives. This means moving from a political-theoretical mode concerned with models of governance, to a critically utopian mode, concerned with emancipatory knowledges and resistance
Mcpherson, Ian (2007). Metaphorical imagination: Resonance, re-orientation, renewal. Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (1):129–139.   (Google | More links)
Mehta, Uday Singh (1992). The Anxiety of Freedom: Imagination and Individuality in Locke's Political Thought. Cornell University Press.   (Google)
Merker, Bjorn (2007). Memory, imagination, and the asymmetry between past and future. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):325-326.   (Google)
Michelini, Ann N. (1992). Did the greeks believe in their myths?: An essay on the constitutive imagination. Ancient Philosophy 12 (2):420-424.   (Google)
Mieszkowski, Jan (2006). Labors of Imagination: Aesthetics and Political Economy From Kant to Althusser. Fordham University Press.   (Google)
Abstract: This book is a major new study of the doctrines of productivity and interest in Romanticism and classical political economy. The author argues that the widespread contemporary embrace of cultural historicism and the rejection of nineteenth-century conceptions of agency have hindered our study of aesthetics and politics. Focusing on the difficulty of coordinating paradigms of intellectual and material labor, Mieszkowski shows that the relationship between the imagination and practical reason is crucial to debates about language and ideology.From the Romantics to Poe and Kafka, writers who explore Kant's claim that poetry "sets the imagination free" discover that the representational and performative powers of language cannot be explained as the products of a self-governing dynamic, whether formal or material. A discourse that neither reflects nor prescribes the values of its society, literature proves to be a uniquely autonomous praxis because it undermines our reliance on the concept of interest as the foundation of self-expression or self-determination. Far from compromising its political significance, this turns literature into the condition of possibility of freedom. For Smith, Bentham, and Marx, the limits of self-rule as a model of agency prompt a similar rethinking of the relationship between language and politics. Their conception of a linguistic labor that informs material praxis is incompatible with the liberal ideal of individualism. In the final analysis, their work invites us to think about social conflicts not as clashes between competing interests, but as a struggle to distinguish human from linguistic imperatives
Miller, Cecilia (1993). Giambattista Vico: Imagination and Historical Knowledge. St. Martin's Press.   (Google)
Miles, Steven (2003). Playing in the dark: Whiteness and the bioethics imagination. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (2):12.   (Google)
Modell, Arnold H. (2003). Imagination and the Meaningful Brain. Bradford Book/MIT Press.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: " In Imagination and the Meaningful Brain, psychoanalyst Arnold Modell claims that subjective human experience must be included in any scientific...
Mohaghegh, Jason Bahbak (2010). New Literature and Philosophy of the Middle East: The Chaotic Imagination. Palgrave Macmillan.   (Google)
Abstract: Machine generated contents note: Images of Chaos: An Introduction * Tactic I: Desertion (chaotic movement) * First Annihilation: Fall of Being, Burial of the Real * Tactic II: Contagion (chaotic transmission) * Second Annihilation: Betrayal, Fracture, and the Poetic Edge * Tactic III: Shadow-Becoming (chaotic appearance) * Chaos-Consciousness: Towards Blindness * Tactic IV: The Inhuman (chaotic incantation) * Epilogue: Corollaries of Emergence.
Montell, Conrad (2002). On evolution of God-seeking mind: An inquiry into why natural selection would favor imagination and distortion of sensory experience. [Journal (Paginated)].   (Google | More links)
Abstract: The earliest known products of human imagination appear to express a primordial concern and struggle with thoughts of dying and of death and mortality. I argue that the structures and processes of imagination evolved in that struggle, in response to debilitating anxieties and fearful states that would accompany an incipient awareness of mortality. Imagination evolved to find that which would make the nascent apprehension of death more bearable, to engage in a search for alternative perceptions of death: a search that was beyond the capability of the external senses. I argue that imagination evolved as flight and fight adaptations in response to debilitating fears that paralleled an emerging foreknowledge of death. Imagination, and symbolic language to express its perceptions, would eventually lead to religious behavior and the development of cultural supports. Although highly speculative, my argument draws on recent brain studies, and on anthropology, psychology, and linguistics
Moosa, Ebrahim (2005). Ghazālī and the Poetics of Imagination. University of North Carolina Press.   (Google)
Abstract: Abu Hamid al-Ghazali, a Muslim jurist-theologian and polymath who lived from the mid-eleventh to the early twelfth century in present-day Iran, is a figure equivalent in stature to Maimonides in Judaism and Thomas Aquinas in Christianity. He is best known for his work in philosophy, ethics, law, and mysticism. In an engaged re-reading of the ideas of this preeminent Muslim thinker, Ebrahim Moosa argues that Ghazali's work has lasting relevance today as a model for a critical encounter with the Muslim intellectual tradition in a modern and postmodern context. Moosa employs the theme of the threshold, or dihliz , the space from which Ghazali himself engaged the different currents of thought in his day, and proposes that contemporary Muslims who wish to place their own traditions in conversation with modern traditions consider the same vantage point. Moosa argues that by incorporating elements of Islamic theology, neoplatonic mysticism, and Aristotelian philosophy, Ghazali's work epitomizes the idea that the answers to life's complex realities do not reside in a single culture or intellectual tradition. Ghazali's emphasis on poiesis--creativity, imagination, and freedom of thought--provides a sorely needed model for a cosmopolitan intellectual renewal among Muslims, Moosa argues. Such a creative and critical inheritance, he concludes, ought to be heeded by those who seek to cultivate Muslim intellectual traditions in today's tumultuous world
Moore, Mary B. (2006). Wonder, imagination, and the matter of theatre in. Philosophy and Literature 30 (2).   (Google)
Morgan, Mary, Imagination and imaging in economic model building.   (Google)
Abstract: Modelling became one of the primary tools of economic research in the 20th century and economists understand their mathematical models as giving some kind of representation of the economic world, one adequate enough for the purpose of reasoning about that world. But when we look at examples of how non-analogical models were first built in economics, both the process of making representations and aspects of the representing relation remain opaque. Like early astronomers, economists have to imagine how the hidden parts of their world are arranged and to make images, that is, create models, to represent how they work. The case of the Edgeworth Box, a widely used model in 20th century economics, provides a good example to explore the role of imagination and images in the process of making representations of the economy
Morris, David (2008). Reversibility and ereignis: On being as Kantian imagination in Merleau-ponty and Heidegger. Philosophy Today:135-143.   (Google)
Abstract: This paper aims to clarify Merleau-Ponty’s difficult concept of “reversibility” by interpreting it as resuming the dialectical critique of the rationalist and empiricist tradition that informs Merleau-Ponty’s earlier work. The focus is on reversibility in “Eye and Mind,” as dismantling the traditional dualism of activity and passivity. This clarification also puts reversibility in continuity with the Phenomenology’s appropriation of Kant, letting us note an affiliation between Merleau-Ponty’s reversibility and Heidegger’s Ereignis: in each case being itself already performs the operation that Kant had located in the imagination. Reversibility discovers this Kantian imagination moving in place, Ereignis discovers it in temporality
Morgan, Harry (1999). The Imagination of Early Childhood Education. Bergin & Garvey.   (Google)
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Abstract:   How is it that metaphors are meaningful, yet we have so much trouble saying exactly what they mean? I argue that metaphoric thought is an act of imagination, mediated by the contingent form of human embodiment. Metaphoric cognition is an example of the productive interplay between intentional imagery and the body scheme, a process of imaginal modeling. The case of metaphor marks the intersection of linguistic and psychological processes and demonstrates the need for a multi-disciplinary approach not only in philosophy of language, but in cognitive science and consciousness studies as well
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Nichols, Shaun (forthcoming). Imagination and immortality: Thinking of me. Synthese.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: Recent work in developmental psychology indicates that children naturally think that psychological states continue after death. One important candidate explanation for why this belief is natural appeals to the idea that we believe in immortality because we can’t imagine our own nonexistence. This paper explores this old idea. To begin, I present a qualified statement of the thesis that we can’t imagine our own nonexistence. I argue that the most prominent explanation for this obstacle, Freud’s, is problematic. I go on to describe some central features of contemporary cognitive accounts of the imagination, and I argue that these accounts provide an independently motivated explanation for the imaginative obstacle. While the imaginative obstacle does not dictate a belief in immortality, it does, I maintain, facilitate such a belief
Nichols, Shaun (2006). Just the imagination: Why imagining doesn't behave like believing. Mind and Language 21 (4):459–474.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: According to recent accounts of the imagination, mental mechanisms that can take input from both imagining and from believing will process imagination-based inputs (pretense representations) and isomorphic beliefs in much the same way. That is, such a mechanism should produce similar outputs whether its input is the belief that p or the pretense representation that p. Unfortunately, there seem to be clear counterexamples to this hypothesis, for in many cases, imagining that p and believing that p have quite different psychological consequences. This paper sets out some central problem cases and argues that the cases might be accommodated by adverting to the role of desires concerning real and imaginary situations
Nigel, Thomas (1998). Imagination, eliminativism, and the pre-history of consciousness. Consciousness Research Abstracts 3.   (Google)
Abstract: Classical and medieval writers had no term for consciousness in anything like the modern sense, and their philosophy seems not to have been troubled by the mind-body problem. Contemporary eliminativists find strong support in this fact for their claim that consciousness does not exist, or, at least, is not an appropriate scientific explanandum. They typically hold that contemporary conceptions of consciousness are artefacts of Descartes' (now outmoded) views about matter and his unrealistic craving for epistemological certainty. Essentially, they say, our belief in consciousness is a residue of once pressing, but now irrelevant, intellectual tensions between religion and the rising new science of the Early Modern period. With the attempts of Descartes and his successors to resolve these tensions, Western thought began down a track toward the conceptual cul-de-sac of the "hard problem". Plausibly, the problem will only be (dis)solved, and the onward march of science assured, when we are able to shake off the pervasive influence of the Cartesian tradition in a way that goes far beyond the mere rejection of dualism. But when we do so, eliminativists contend, the distinctively Cartesian notion of consciousness will simply drop out of our world-picture, like phlogiston or the vital entelechy
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Noordhof, Paul (2002). Imagining objects and imagining experiences. Mind and Language 17 (4):426-455.   (Cited by 5 | Google | More links)
North, John David; Nauta, Lodi & Vanderjagt, Arie Johan (eds.) (1999). Between Demonstration and Imagination: Essays in the History of Science and Philosophy Presented to John D. North. Brill.   (Google)
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Pezzulo, Giovanni & Castelfranchi, Cristiano (2009). Thinking as the Control of Imagination: a Conceptual Framework for Goal-Directed Systems. Psychological Research 73 (4):559-577.   (Google)
Abstract: This paper offers a conceptual framework which (re)integrates goal-directed control, motivational processes, and executive functions, and suggests a developmentalpathway from situated action to higher level cognition. We first illustrate a basic computational (control-theoretic) model of goal-directed action that makes use of internalmodeling. We then show that by adding the problem of selection among multiple actionalternatives motivation enters the scene, and that the basic mechanisms of executivefunctions such as inhibition, the monitoring of progresses, and working memory, arerequired for this system to work. Further, we elaborate on the idea that the off-line re-enactment of anticipatory mechanisms used for action control gives rise to (embodied)mental simulations, and propose that thinking consists essentially in controlling mental simulations rather than directly controlling behavior and perceptions. We concludeby sketching an evolutionary perspective of this process, proposing that anticipationleveraged cognition, and by highlighting specific predictions of our model.
Pezzulo, Giovanni & Castelfranchi, Cristiano (2009). Thinking as the Control of Imagination: a Conceptual Framework for Goal-Directed Systems. Psychological Research 73 (4):559-577.   (Google)
Abstract: This paper offers a conceptual framework which (re)integrates goal-directed control, motivational processes, and executive functions, and suggests a developmentalpathway from situated action to higher level cognition. We first illustrate a basic computational (control-theoretic) model of goal-directed action that makes use of internalmodeling. We then show that by adding the problem of selection among multiple actionalternatives motivation enters the scene, and that the basic mechanisms of executivefunctions such as inhibition, the monitoring of progresses, and working memory, arerequired for this system to work. Further, we elaborate on the idea that the off-line re-enactment of anticipatory mechanisms used for action control gives rise to (embodied)mental simulations, and propose that thinking consists essentially in controlling mental simulations rather than directly controlling behavior and perceptions. We concludeby sketching an evolutionary perspective of this process, proposing that anticipationleveraged cognition, and by highlighting specific predictions of our model.
Phillips, Jamie L. (1999). Can imagination provide prima facie justification for possibility? A problem for Tye. Southwest Philosophy Review 15 (1):149-156.   (Google)
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Abstract:  Engineering Ethics literature tends to emphasize wrongdoing, its avoidance, or its prevention. It also tends to focus on identifiable events, especially those that involve unfortunate, sometimes disastrous consequences. This paper shifts attention to the positive in engineering practice; and, as a result, the need for addressing questions of character and imagination becomes apparent
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Abstract: I argue that it is a main theme of Davidson's theory of interpretation that interpretive charity implies the impossibility of massive disagreement. There is clear textual support for that. I then argue that from the first-person point of view of a full-blooded interpreter, the theme must be accepted; and that is precisely why Davidson accepts it. If massive disagreement between speaker and interpreter seems to us easy to imagine, it is only because the imagination involved is third-personal and not full-blooded.
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Abstract: I argue that it is a main theme of Davidson's theory of interpretation that interpretive charity implies the impossibility of massive disagreement. There is clear textual support for that. I then argue that from the first-person point of view of a full-blooded interpreter, the theme must be accepted; and that is precisely why Davidson accepts it. If massive disagreement between speaker and interpreter seems to us easy to imagine, it is only because the imagination involved is third-personal and not full-blooded.
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Abstract: This paper begins by examining a text in which one writer, Richard Ford, is discussing both the persona and the work of another writer, Raymond Carver. Ford''s positive reaction to Carver provides us with a puzzle as to what the basis for it is. I suggest that what he is really admiring is a kind of originality that he detects in Carver. I try to specify the constitutive rules for the generation of this form of originality. They seem to take the form of at once being able to preserve what is valuable in existing material and yet managing to add what could be said to be missing. I then argue that, if Carver is doing this sort of work, so too is Ford. Having seen various examples of a kind of originality, I argue that the process we have been seeing might be formulated as the exercise of imagination, and address the issue of the possible significance of accomplishing such imaginative work. If, as many contemporary philosophers and workers in the human sciences have argued, there is no escape from the need for interpretation, there is a problem of what could ever be a satisfactory interpretation. I suggest that the idea or the possibility of an imaginative interpretation could be a way of providing such satisfaction
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Rivera, Lisa (2006). Pluralism, Imagination and Estrangement. Philosophical Papers 35 (3):327-365.   (Google)
Rømer, Thomas Aastrup (forthcoming). Imagination and judgment in John Dewey's philosophy: Intelligent transactions in a democratic context. Educational Philosophy and Theory.   (Google)
Abstract: In this essay, I attempt to interpret the educational philosophy of John Dewey in a way that accomplishes two goals. The first of these is to avoid any reference to Dewey as a propagator of a particular scientific method or to any of the individualist and cognitivist ideas that is sometimes associated with him. Secondly, I want to overcome the tendency to interpret Dewey as a naturalist by looking at his concept of intelligence. It is argued that 'intelligent experience' is the basic concept of education. I suggest how this concept should be understood. I propose to look at it as an interplay between the faculties of imagination and judgment
Robelli, (1994). Intelligence or Imagination?: A Reappraisal of the Past-- For a Better Tomorrow. Book Guild.   (Google)
Robinson, Gillian & Rundell, John F. (eds.) (1994). Rethinking Imagination: Culture and Creativity. Routledge.   (Google)
Abstract: Discusses the different ways in which the concept of imagination has been construed, and provides fascinating glimpses of the role of imagination in the creation and management of Modernity
Roca, Esther (forthcoming). The exercise of moral imagination in stigmatized work groups. Journal of Business Ethics.   (Google)
Abstract: This study introduces the concept of moral imagination in a work context to provide an ethical approach to the controversial relationships between dirty work and dirty workers. Moral imagination is assessed as an essential faculty to overcome the stigma associated with dirty work and facilitate the daily work lives of workers. The exercise of moral imagination helps dirty workers to face the moral conflicts inherent in their tasks and to build a personal stance toward their occupation. Finally, we argue that organizations with dirty work groups should actively adopt measures to encourage their employees’ exercise of moral imagination. This study investigates how organizations might create conditions that inspire moral imagination, particularly with regard to the importance of organizational culture as a means to enhance workers’ moral sensitivity. Furthermore, this investigation analyzes different company practices that may derive from a culture committed to moral imagination
Rorty, Amélie (2009). Educating the practical imagination : A prolegomena. In Harvey Siegel (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Oxford University Press.   (Google)
Rosenberg, Randall S. (2007). The catholic imagination and modernity: William Cavanaugh's theopolitical imagination and Charles Taylor's modern social imagination. Heythrop Journal 48 (6):911–931.   (Google | More links)
Russow, Lilly-Marlene (1978). Some recent work on imagination. American Philosophical Quarterly 15 (January):57-66.   (Cited by 2 | Google)
Russow, Lilly-Marlene (1980). Towards a theory of imagination. Southern Journal of Philosophy 18:353-370.   (Cited by 1 | Google)
Saler, Michael T. (2004). Modernity, disenchantment, and the ironic imagination. Philosophy and Literature 28 (1).   (Google)
Abstract: : Western "modernity" has often been identified with the "disenchantment of the world." But if this is true, how do we account for the millions of sober adults who nevertheless delight in Elvish grammar or Elvis sightings? Perhaps these are manifestations of the dialectic of Enlightenment, an alternate view that perceives modernity's faith in reason as itself a myth, and mass culture the exemplification of how the irrational has come to dominate everyday life. This essay, however, locates in mass culture an attempt to reconcile the rational and secular tenets of modernity with the wonders and marvels that modernity was thought to supercede: a specifically modern enchantment
Sanford, A. Whitney (forthcoming). Ethics, narrative, and agriculture: Transforming agricultural practice through ecological imagination. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics.   (Google)
Abstract: The environmental degradation caused by industrial agriculture, as well as the resulting social and health consequences, creates an urgency to rethink food production by expanding the moral imagination to include agricultural practices. Agricultural practices presume human use of the earth and acknowledge human dependence on the biotic community, and these relations mean that agriculture presents a separate set of considerations in the broader field of environmental ethics. Many scholars and activists have argued persuasively that we need new stories to rethink agricultural practice, however, the link—the story that does and can shape agricultural practice—has not yet been fully articulated in environmental discourse. My analysis explores how language has shaped existing agricultural models and, more important, the potential of story to influence agricultural practice. To do this, I draw upon cognitive theory to illustrate how metaphoric and narrative language structures thought and influences practice, beginning with my contention that industrial agriculture relies on a discourse of mechanistic relations between humans and a passive earth, language that has naturalized the chemically intensive monocultures prevalent in much of the American Midwest. However, alternative agricultures, including organic agriculture, agro-ecology, and ecological agriculture, emphasize qualities such as interdependence and reciprocity and do so as a deliberate response to the perceived inadequacies of industrial agriculture and its governing narrative. Exploring the different discourses of agricultural systems can help us think through different modalities for human relations with the biotic community and demonstrate story’s potential role in altering practice
Saniotis, Arthur (2009). Encounters with the religious imagination and the emergence of creativity. World Futures 65 (7):464 – 476.   (Google)
Abstract: Ervin Laszlo's notion of the interrelationship between evolution and creativity as being intrinsic to universal life processes has been influential to the biological and social sciences. Central to Laszlo's thinking is the notion of convergence in biological and social systems that are posited on creative complexity. In this article, I employ Laszlo's concept of creativity in relation to the human religious imagination. Cross-cultural studies of the religious imagination examine the architecture of human consciousness and ways of knowing. These two areas are interlinked and generate new kinds of knowledge and understanding of the self and the world. In this way, the religious imagination is a means of generating new possibilities of mind and consciousness
Sartre, Jean-Paul (2004). The Imaginary: A Phenomenological Psychology of the Imagination. Routledge.   (Google)
Schneider, Herbert W. (1947). A century of romantic imagination in America. Philosophical Review 56 (4):351-356.   (Google | More links)
Schinkel, Anders (2005). Imagination as a category of history: An essay concerning Koselleck's concepts of erfahrungsraum and erwartungshorizont. History and Theory 44 (1):42–54.   (Google | More links)
Schlutz, Alexander M. (2009). Mind's World: Imagination and Subjectivity From Descartes to Romanticism. University of Washington Press.   (Google)
Abstract: Introduction -- Epistemology, metaphysics, and rhetoric : contexts of imagination -- Aristotle, Phantasia, and the problem of epistemology -- Plato, the neoplatonists, and the vagaries of the sublunar world -- Phantasia and ecstatic knowledge -- A more skillful artist than imitation -- Dreams, doubts, and evil demons : Descartes and imagination -- Mediatio prima : certainty, the cogito, and imagination -- Imagination in the rules -- Meditatio secunda : the world of the cogito -- Descartes, Montaigne, and Pascal -- Analogies and enthusiasm -- Excogitations : fabulating the cogito -- The reasonable imagination : Immanuel Kant's critical philosophy -- Imagination in the limits of pure reason -- Dreamers and madmen : imagination in the anthropology -- Natural art and sublime madness : imagination in the critique of judgment -- The highest point of philosophy : Fichte's reimagining of the kantian system -- The logics of positing intellectual intuition and the absolute subject -- Ecstasy, inspired communication, and philosophical genius -- Light, dusk, and darkness : the reconciliation of opposites -- The metaphysics of oscillation and the truth of imagination -- Reason fixations : arresting imagination -- A system without foundations : poetic subjectivity in Friedrich von Hardenberg's Ordo inversus -- A system without foundations -- Fantasy and the body -- Divine law and abject subjectivity : Coleridge and the double knowledge of imagination -- Divine imagination -- The abyss of the empirical self -- Coda: Imagining ideology.
Schalow, Frank (1996). Textuality and imagination: The refracted image of Hegelian dialectic. Research in Phenomenology 26 (1):155-170.   (Google)
Scribner, F. Scott (2010). Matters of Spirit: J.G. Fichte and the Technological Imagination. Pennsylvania State University Press.   (Google)
Abstract: Introduction -- An introduction to the crisis of spirit : technology and the Fichtean imagination -- Technology and truth : representation and the problem of the third term -- Spirit and the technology of the letter -- The spatial imagination : affect, image, and the critique of representational consciousness -- Subtle matter and the ground of intersubjectivity -- The aesthetic of influence -- The first displacement : from subjectivity to being -- The second displacement : from a metaphysical to a technological imagination.
S. Delcomminette, (2003). False pleasures, appearance and imagination in the philebus. Phronesis 48 (3):215-237.   (Google)
Abstract: This paper examines the discussion about false pleasures in the Philebus (36 c3-44 a11). After stressing the crucial importance of this discussion in the economy of the dialogue, it attempts to identify the problematic locus of the possibility of true or false pleasures. Socrates points to it by means of an analogy between pleasure and doxa. Against traditional interpretations, which reduce the distinction drawn in this passage to a distinction between doxa and pleasure on the one hand and their object on the other, it is argued that, rather, Socrates distinguishes between the mere fact of having a doxa or a pleasure, on the one hand, and the content of these acts, on the other hand. Consequently, the possibility for a pleasure to be false does not concern its relation to an object, but the affective content which defines it. In order to show how the affective content of a pleasure can be false, it is necessary to examine the three species of false pleasures described by Socrates in their relation to appearance and imagination. Appearance is not identical with perception for Plato: it consists in a mixture of perception and doxa. As for imagination, it consists in "illustrating" a doxa present in the soul by means of a "quasi-perception". It is the presence of a doxa in each of these processes which makes it possible for them to be true or false, while mere perception cannot be either true or false. It is then argued that according to the Philebus pleasure can be false precisely because its affective content is not a mere perception, but either an appearance or an imagination
Seabright, Mark A. & Schminke, Marshall (2002). Immoral imagination and revenge in organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 38 (1-2).   (Google)
Abstract: Malevolence and cruelty are commonly attributed to a failure of moral reasoning or a lack of moral imagination. We present the contrasting viewpoint – immorality as an active, creative, or resourceful act. More specifically, we develop the concept of "immoral imagination" (Jacobs, 1991) and explore how it can enter into Rest's (1986) four processes of decision making: sensitivity, judgment, intention, and implementation. The literature on revenge and workplace deviance illustrates these processes
Seifriz, William (1943). Creative imagination and indeterminism. Philosophy of Science 10 (1):25-33.   (Google | More links)
Sen, Ramendra Kumar (1965). Imagination in coleridge and abhinavagupta: A critical analysis of Christian and saiva standpoints. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 24 (1):97-107.   (Google | More links)
Shang, Jie (2007). Imagination of the evil. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (3).   (Google)
Abstract:   Sartre’s “transcendence of the ego” means that consciousness is outside of the ego, that the ego is the “ego of the other”, and that the other is neither in consciousness nor in the ego. Sartre viewed “reflection” as a pure mood rather than as the substantial carrier of mood. The strangeness and absurdity of the world emerge from this reflection. Sartre’s “imagination of the evil” has two aspects. On the one hand, “evil” corresponds to the concept of the other, transcending the capacity for domination of the ego; on the other hand, imagination is related to the other in a broad sense, with the ability to transform “philistinism” and “evil” into marvels
Sherwin, Richard K. (ms). Sublime jurisprudence: On the ethical education of the legal imagination in our time.   (Google)
Abstract:      The broad dissemination of digital communication technologies is raising disturbing questions about the nature of truth as representation. This epistemological crisis shares an uncanny affinity with the crisis of representation that lay at the heart of the baroque era during the 17th century in Europe. The resolution of that crisis, through the work of Descartes and others, came on the heels of a philosophical shift from the image to the sign. Not incidentally, that move was accompanied by significant political and juridical developments, including: the origin of legal positivism, the rise of conventionalism (or nominalism), the disenchantment of nature and the decline of natural law, and the emergence of the modern nation-state. The semiotic model today, however, is strained to the breaking point. Infinitely mutable digital signs proliferate as copies of copies; signifiers have been shorn of the signified. The ensuing mutation of the Cartesian sign into the digital image has been accompanied by significant political and juridical developments. Individual autonomy, universal reason, and calculative rationality - the traditional foundation for core Liberal values - are being challenged by digital practices. Like the baroque crisis of visuality that preceded it, the current crisis of the digital neo-baroque will not ease until confidence is restored not only in acceptable forms of truth as representation, but also in the mimetic faculty itself, which is to say, in the human capacity to represent self and others. 'Sublime jurisprudence' is a metaphysical model that seeks to address this need
Shipley, G. J. (2002). Imagination and fission futures. Analysis 62 (276):324–327.   (Google | More links)
Shulman, David (2008). Illumination, imagination, creativity: Rājaśekhara, kuntaka, and jagannātha on pratibhā. Journal of Indian Philosophy 36 (4).   (Google)
Silverman, Hugh J. (1978). Imagining, perceiving, and remembering. Humanitas 14 (May):197-207.   (Google)
Singh, Charu Sheel (1994). Concentric Imagination: Mandala Literary Theory. Sales Office, D.K. Publishers Distributors (P) Ltd..   (Google)
Sinha, Chris (2010). Iconology and imagination : Explorations in sociogenetic economies. In Armin W. Geertz & Jeppe Sinding Jensen (eds.), Religious Narrative, Cognition, and Culture: Image and Word in the Mind of Narrative. Equinox Pub. Ltd..   (Google)
Skilleås, Ole Martin (2006). Knowledge and imagination in fiction and autobiography. Metaphilosophy 37 (2):259–276.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: Autobiographies are particularly interesting in the context of moral philosophy because they offer us rare and extended examples of how other people think, feel and reflect, which is of crucial importance in the development of phronesis (practical wisdom). In this article, Martha Nussbaum's use of fictional literature is shown to be of limited interest, and her arguments in Poetic Justice against the use of personal narratives in moral philosophy are shown to be unfounded. An analysis of Aristotle's concept of mimesis shows that Nussbaum's claims for fictional literature also apply to personal narratives. A case is then made for the importance of personal narratives in developing practical wisdom, and three sub-genres of autobiography are discussed: (1) the confession, (2) the apology and (3) the testimonial. These sub-genres exemplify some of the unique features of personal narratives
Sloan, Douglas (2008). Insight-Imagination: The Emancipation of Thought and the Modern World. Barfield Press.   (Google)
Abstract: Fragmented thinking, broken world -- Toward recovery of wholeness: the radical humanities and traditional wisdom -- Toward recovery of wholeness: another look at science -- Insight-imagination -- Living thinking, living world: toward an education of insight-imagination.
Smith, Joel (2006). Bodily awareness, imagination, and the self. European Journal Of Philosophy 14 (1):49-68.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: Common wisdom tells us that we have five senses: sight, hearing, smell, taste and touch. These senses provide us with a means of gaining information concerning objects in the world around us, including our own bodies. But in addition to these five senses, each of us is aware of our own body in way in which we are aware of no other thing. These ways include our awareness of the position, orientation, movement, and size of our limbs (proprioception and kinaesthesia), our sense of balance, and our awareness of bodily sensations such as pains, tickles, and sensations of pressure or temperature. We can group these together under the title
Smith, Justin E. H. (2006). Imagination and the problem of heredity in mechanist embryology. In Justin E. H. Smith (ed.), The Problem of Animal Generation in Early Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.   (Google)
Snoeyenbos, Milton H. (1977). On the concept of imagination. Darshana International 17 (October):34-39.   (Google)
South, James B. (2001). Francisco suárez on imagination. Vivarium 39 (1):119-158.   (Google)
Stark, Tracey (1992). Book review of Rudolf M. Makkreel imagination and interpretation in Kant: The hermeneutical import of the critique of judgment: Review: Rudolf M. Makkreel, imagination and interpretation in Kant: The hermeneutical import of the critique of judgment. The university of chicago press: Chicago and London, 1990. $24.95. Philosophy and Social Criticism 18 (1).   (Google)
Stawarska, Beata (2005). Defining imagination: Sartre between Husserl and Janet. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (2).   (Google)
Abstract:   The essay traces the double, phenomenological and psychological, background of Sartre’s theory of the imagination. Insofar as these two phenomenological and psychological currents are equally influential for Sartre’s theory of the imagination, his intellectual project is situated in an inter-disciplinary research area which combines the descriptive analyses of Edmund Husserl with the clinical reports and psychological theories of Pierre Janet. While Husserl provides the foundation for the prevailing theory of imagination as pictorial representation, Janet’s findings on obsessive behavior enrich an alternative current in Sartre’s thinking about imagination as spontaneous and self-determined creativity
Stawarska, Beata (2001). Pictorial representation or subjective scenario? Sartre on imagination. Sartre Studies International 7 (2):87-111.   (Google)
Abstract: The major thesis developed in Sartre's L'imaginaire is that all imaginary acts can be subsumed under the heading of one "image family" and, therefore, that imagination as a whole can be theorized in terms of pictorial representation. Yet this theory fails to meet the objective of Sartre's study, to demonstrate that imaginary activity is not a derivative of perception but an attitude with a character and dignity of its own. The subsidiary account of imagination in terms of neutralization of belief has the advantage of not being constrained by the requirement that imaginary activity serve a purely reproductive function of bringing an absent "original" into a quasi presence and, thus, leaves room for free creativity and fiction. It also points to a concrete lived experience of alterity at the heart of subjective life where the subject stages its life as if it were the life of an other, putting pressure onto Sartre's contention that the cogito defines subjectivity
Stark, Tracey (1997). Review essay : Richard Kearney's hermeneutic imagination: Richard Kearney, poetics of modernity: Toward a hermeneu tic imagination (atlantic highlands, nj: Humanities press, 1995) also under consideration by Richard Kearney: Poetics O f imagining: From Husserl to Lyotard (london: Rout ledge, 1994); modern movements in european philosophy (2nd edn, Manchester: Manchester university press, 1994); states of mind (Manchester: Manchester university press, 1995). Philosophy and Social Criticism 23 (2).   (Google)
Stewart, Pamela J. & Strathern, Andrew (2010). How can will be expressed and what role does the imagination play? In Keith M. Murphy & C. Jason Throop (eds.), Toward an Anthropology of the Will. Stanford University Press.   (Google)
Steenbakkers, Piet (2004). Spinoza on the imagination. In Lodi Nauta & Detlev Pätzold (eds.), Imagination in the Later Middle Ages and Early Modern Times. Peeters.   (Google)
Steeves, James B. (2001). The virtual body: Merleau-ponty's early philosophy of imagination. Philosophy Today:370-380.   (Google)
Stoljar, Daniel (2009). Précis of ignorance and imagination. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79 (3):748-755.   (Google)
Stock, Kathleen (2007). Sartre, Wittgenstein, and learning from imagination. In Peter Goldie & Elisabeth Schellekens (eds.), Philosophy and Conceptual Art. Oxford University Press.   (Google)
Strawson, P. F. (1982). Imagination and perception. In Ralph Charles Sutherland Walker (ed.), Kant on Pure Reason. Oxford University Press.   (Google)
Strong, & Edward W. William), (1983). Vico's science of imagination. Journal of the History of Philosophy 21 (2).   (Google)
Stuart, Susan A. J. (2010). Conscious machines: Memory, melody and muscular imagination. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (1).   (Google)
Abstract: A great deal of effort has been, and continues to be, devoted to developing consciousness artificially (A small selection of the many authors writing in this area includes: Cotterill (J Conscious Stud 2:290–311, 1995 , 1998 ), Haikonen ( 2003 ), Aleksander and Dunmall (J Conscious Stud 10:7–18, 2003 ), Sloman ( 2004 , 2005 ), Aleksander ( 2005 ), Holland and Knight ( 2006 ), and Chella and Manzotti ( 2007 )), and yet a similar amount of effort has gone in to demonstrating the infeasibility of the whole enterprise (Most notably: Dreyfus ( 1972/1979 , 1992 , 1998 ), Searle ( 1980 ), Harnad (J Conscious Stud 10:67–75, 2003 ), and Sternberg ( 2007 ), but there are a great many others). My concern in this paper is to steer some navigable channel between the two positions, laying out the necessary pre-conditions for consciousness in an artificial system, and concentrating on what needs to hold for the system to perform as a human being or other phenomenally conscious agent in an intersubjectively-demanding social and moral environment. By adopting a thick notion of embodiment—one that is bound up with the concepts of the lived body and autopoiesis (Maturana and Varela 1980 ; Varela et al. 2003 ; and Ziemke 2003 , 2007a , J Conscious Stud 14(7):167–179, 2007b )—I will argue that machine phenomenology is only possible within an embodied distributed system that possesses a richly affective musculature and a nervous system such that it can, through action and repetition, develop its tactile-kinaesthetic memory, individual kinaesthetic melodies pertaining to habitual practices, and an anticipatory enactive kinaesthetic imagination. Without these capacities the system would remain unconscious, unaware of itself embodied within a world. Finally, and following on from Damasio’s ( 1991 , 1994 , 1999 , 2003 ) claims for the necessity of pre-reflective conscious, emotional, bodily responses for the development of an organism’s core and extended consciousness, I will argue that without these capacities any agent would be incapable of developing the sorts of somatic markers or saliency tags that enable affective reactions, and which are indispensable for effective decision-making and subsequent survival. My position, as presented here, remains agnostic about whether or not the creation of artificial consciousness is an attainable goal
Stuart, Susan A. J. (2007). Machine consciousness: Cognitive and kinaesthetic imagination. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (7):141-153.   (Cited by 1 | Google | More links)
Abstract: Machine consciousness exists already in organic systems and it is only a matter of time -- and some agreement -- before it will be realised in reverse-engineered organic systems and forward- engineered inorganic systems. The agreement must be over the preconditions that must first be met if the enterprise is to be successful, and it is these preconditions, for instance, being a socially-embedded, structurally-coupled and dynamic, goal-directed entity that organises its perceptual input and enacts its world through the application of both a cognitive and kinaesthetic imagination, that I shall concentrate on presenting in this paper. It will become clear that these preconditions will present engineers with a tall order, but not, I will argue, an impossible one. After all, we might agree with Freeman and Núñez's claim that the machine metaphor has restricted the expectations of the cognitive sciences (Freeman & Núñez, 1999); but it is a double-edged sword, since our limited expectations about machines also narrow the potential of our cognitive science
Sutrop, Margit (2002). Imagination and the act of fiction-making. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (3):332 – 344.   (Google | More links)
Sweeney, Robert (1998). Review essay : Richard Kearney, poetics of modernity: Toward a hermeneutic imagination (highlands, nj: Humanities press, 1995. Philosophy and Social Criticism 24 (5).   (Google)
Szymkowiak, Aaron (2007). Hutcheson's painless imagination and the problem of moral beauty. International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (3):349-368.   (Google)
Abstract: A peculiar feature of Hutcheson’s system is his claim that there exist no original pains in the imagination, and hence no real displeasures concerning form or beauty. This position, when set against a clear emphasis upon the pains of the moral sense in apprehending evil, seems to render tenuous his frequent analogies between the experiences of beauty and goodness. In light of this apparent discrepancy in Hutcheson’s argument, the repeated use of the term “moral beauty” presents interpretive difficulties, particularly on the matter of whether, and in what way, goodness is itself a species of beauty. These problems can be surmounted by way of close attention to Hutcheson’s connection and ordering of the various “senses.” On the present interpretation, Hutcheson denies formal displeasure aspart of a broader theological argument concerning the moral function of the imagination. On this view, “moral beauty” is a special type of imaginative pleasure
Tanner, Sonja (2010). In Praise of Plato's Poetic Imagination. Lexington Books.   (Google)
Abstract: Introduction -- A history of the ancient "quarrel" : the philosophical "side" -- On the "side" of poetry in the ancient "quarrel" -- Imagination in the Sophist -- The pharmacological structure of the imagination -- The unity of form and content in Platonic dialogues -- Imagination and the ancient "quarrel".
Taylor, Paul (1981). Imagination and information. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 42 (December):205-223.   (Cited by 1 | Google | More links)
Thomas, Nigel J. T. (online). Attitude and image, or, what will simulation theory let us eliminate?   (Google | More links)
Abstract: Stich & Ravenscroft (1994) have argued that (contrary to most people's initial assumptions) a simulation account of folk psychology may be consistent with eliminative materialism, but they fail to bring out the full complexity or the potential significance of the relationship. Contemporary eliminativism (particularly in the Churchland version) makes two major claims: the first is a rejection of the orthodox assumption that realistically construed propositional attitudes are fundamental to human cognition; the second is the suggestion that with the advancement of scientific understanding of the mind it will be possible to entirely eliminate the mentalistic and intentional from our ontology, thus dissolving the mind-body problem. The first claim (which has been argued in detail) supplies the principal grounds for accepting the second, much more ambitious and significant, claim. Robert Gordon's (1995, 1996, 2000) radical simulation theory of "folk psychology", proposed initially (Gordon, 1986) as an alternative to "theory theory" accounts of self and interpersonal understanding, but subsequently developing into a quite general challenge to symbolic computational accounts of mind, is not merely consistent with, but actually provides considerable additional support for, the first eliminativist claim. However, although radical simulationism has no use for reified propositional attitudes, it relies on another family of mentalistic and intentional notions, including perspective taking, "seeing as", pretending, imagery, and, most centrally, imagination. It is thus inconsistent with eliminativist metaphysical ambitions. Nevertheless, from this perspective the mind-body problem is transformed. Its solution no longer depends on accounting directly for the intentionality of the attitudes, but rather on accounting for the intentionality of imagination. Although standard accounts of imagination derive its intentionality from that of the attitudes, the recently proposed "perceptual activity" theory of imagery and imagination (Thomas, 1999) can provide a direct account of the intentionality of imagination that is consistent with physicalism..
Thomas, Nigel (1999). Are theories of imagery theories of imagination? Cognitive Science 23:207--45.   (Google)
Abstract: Can theories of mental imagery, conscious mental contents, developed within cognitive science throw light on the obscure (but culturally very significant) concept of imagination? Three extant views of mental imagery are considered: quasi-pictorial, description, and perceptual activity theories. The first two face serious theoretical and empirical difficulties. The third is (for historically contingent reasons) little known, theoretically underdeveloped, and empirically untried, but has real explanatory potential. It rejects the "traditional" symbolic computational view of mental contents, but is compatible with recent situated cognition and active vision approaches in robotics. This theory is developed and elucidated. Three related key aspects of imagination (non-discursiveness, creativity, and seeing as) raise difficulties for the other theories. Perceptual activity theory presents imagery as non-discursive and relates it closely to seeing as. It is thus well placed to be the basis for a general theory of imagination and its role in creative thought.
Thomas, Nigel J. T. (1999). Are theories of imagery theories of imagination? An active perception approach to conscious mental content. Cognitive Science 23 (2):207-245.   (Cited by 117 | Google | More links)
Abstract: Can theories of mental imagery, conscious mental contents, developed within cognitive science throw light on the obscure (but culturally very significant) concept of imagination? Three extant views of mental imagery are considered: quasi-pictorial, description, and perceptual activity theories. The first two face serious theoretical and empirical difficulties. The third is (for historically contingent reasons) little known, theoretically underdeveloped, and empirically untried, but has real explanatory potential. It rejects the "traditional" symbolic computational view of mental contents, but is compatible with recent *situated cognition* and *active vision* approaches in robotics. This theory is developed and elucidated. Three related key aspects of imagination (non-discursiveness, creativity, and *seeing as*) raise difficulties for the other theories. Perceptual activity theory presents imagery as non-discursive and relates it closely to *seeing as*. It is thus well placed to be the basis for a general theory of imagination and its role in creative thought
Thomas, Nigel J. T. (1998). Imagination, eliminativism, and the pre-history of consciousness. Consciousness Research Abstracts 3.   (Cited by 4 | Google | More links)
Abstract: Classical and medieval writers had no term for consciousness in anything like the modern sense, and their philosophy seems not to have been troubled by the mind-body problem. Contemporary eliminativists find strong support in this fact for their claim that consciousness does not exist, or, at least, is not an appropriate scientific explanandum. They typically hold that contemporary conceptions of consciousness are artefacts of Descartes' (now outmoded) views about matter and his unrealistic craving for epistemological certainty. Essentially, they say, our belief in consciousness is a residue of once pressing, but now irrelevant, intellectual tensions between religion and the rising new science of the Early Modern period. With the attempts of Descartes and his successors to resolve these tensions, Western thought began down a track toward the conceptual cul-de-sac of the "hard problem". Plausibly, the problem will only be (dis)solved, and the onward march of science assured, when we are able to shake off the pervasive influence of the Cartesian tradition in a way that goes far beyond the mere rejection of dualism. But when we do so, eliminativists contend, the distinctively Cartesian notion of consciousness will simply drop out of our world-picture, like phlogiston or the vital entelechy
Thomas, Nigel J. T. (2003). Imagining minds. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (11):79-84.   (Google)
Thomas, Alan (online). Perceptual knowledge, representation and imagination.   (Google)
Abstract: The focus of this paper will be on the problem of perceptual presence and on a solution to this problem pioneered by Kant [1781; 1783] and refined by Sellars [Sellars, 1978] and Strawson [Strawson, 1971]. The problem of perceptual presence is that of explaining how our perceptual experience of the world gives us a robust sense of the presence of objects in perception over and above those sensory aspects of the object given in perception. Objects possess other properties which are, one might say, phenomenologically present even though they are admittedly sensorily absent. The general form of the solution to this problem that Kant developed seems to me to be a neglected resource in contemporary work on perceptual consciousness. Kant solves the problem of perceptual presence by appealing to that which he called the productive use of the imagination. This faculty of mind supplies schematic representations of the object of perception that explains a phenomenological sense of perceptual presence even of those features that are not, in a sense to be further clarified,
Thomas, Nigel (ms). The study of imagination as an approach to consciousness.   (Google)
Abstract: The concept of consciousness appears to have had little currency before the 17th century. Not only did philosophers before Descartes fail to worry about how consciousness fitted into the natural world, they did not even claim to be conscious. If we are conscious, however, we must assume that they were too, and it hardly seems plausible that they could have been unaware of it. In fact, when the mind was discussed in former ages, both before and within the work of Descartes, the concept of imagination filled most (not all) of the key conceptual roles that consciousness fills today. Although it was not considered uniquely problematic, in the way that consciousness is, imagination continued to be used in these ways long after the Cartesian revolution. It was both the mental arena where thinking took place - where ideas (images) had their being and their interaction - and, implicitly, the power whereby the deliverances of the material sense organs were integrated and rendered meaningful (and, thereby, rendered 'mental'). This suggests that the study of the imagination (in the relevant senses) ought to have a considerable bearing on the study of consciousness, and it may even provide a way to outflank the notorious 'hard problem' that seems to stand in the way of a direct scientific assault on consciousness itself
Trevor-Roper, H. R. (1980). History and Imagination. Oxford University Press.   (Google)
Troyer, John (2008). Review of Stephen Mulhall, Wittgenstein's private language: Grammar, nonsense, and imagination in philosophical investigations, §§ 143–315. Philosophical Books 49 (4):383-384.   (Google)
Turnbull, Kenneth (1994). Aristotle on imagination: De Anima III. Ancient Philosophy 14 (2):319-334.   (Google)
Turner, Mark, Imagination and creativity: Lectures at the college de France, 2: The invention of meaning (l'imagination et la créativité: Confèrences au collège de France, 2: L'invention du sens).   (Google)
Abstract:      The second of four lectures at the Collège de France in 2000 on the subject of conceptual mappings and conceptual structure
Turner, Mark, Imagination and creativity: Lectures at the college de France, 4: The cognitive neuroscience of creativity (l'imagination et la créativité: Confèrences au collège de France, 4: La neuroscience cognitive de la créativité).   (Google)
Abstract:      The fourth of four lectures at the Collège de France in 2000 on the subject of conceptual mappings and conceptual structure
Tuveson, Ernest Lee (1960). The Imagination as a Means of Grace. New York,Gordian Press.   (Google)
Urmson, J. O. (1971). Memory and imagination. Mind 80 (1):70-92.   (Cited by 1 | Google | More links)
Urmson, J. O. (1967). Memory and imagination. Mind 76 (301):83-91.   (Google | More links)
van Woudenberg, René (2006). Introduction: Knowledge through imagination. Metaphilosophy 37 (2):151–161.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: This introduction presents an overview of the articles in this special issue, within the framework of an argument for the conclusion that there are various roads leading from imagination to knowledge
van Leeuwen, Henk J. (2009). only a god can save us: Heidegger, Poetic Imagination and the modern Malaise. Common Ground Publishing.   (Google)
Abstract: In the shadow of a looming global ecological and social catastrophe 'Only a God Can Save Us: Heidegger, Poetic Imagination and the Modern Malaise' is timely and essential reading. The book argues that technology by itself cannot save the diversity, integrity and habitability of the planet. Averting disaster calls for a radical transformation in our very being. Humanity is at an unprecedented crossroad where crucial and difficult decisions must be made about how we are to live. This book attends to a crisis in the human psyche that, it suggests, is at the root of the ever more pressing contemporary problems. Aimed at an intelligent lay audience it has ramifications in domains ranging from art, literature and sociology to environmental management, ecology and technology. Moreover, van Leeuwen's insightful grasp of the core of the Martin Heidegger's later thinking makes this book also invaluable to scholars and students of this influential and controversial philosopher, as well as those with a wider interest in continental philosophy. It uncovers an extraordinary, but rarely trodden or overlooked pathway of thinking that offers the means to a way of being as authentic dwellers of the earth. The author identifies an ‘in-between region’ within thought where the poetic imagination is awakened (implicating 'the gods') and enabled to respond creatively. From this emerges the possibility of a genuinely sustainable way of thinking and active commitment.
Verene, Donald Phillip (1981). Vico's Science of Imagination. Cornell University Press.   (Google)
Victor Caston, (1996). Why Aristotle needs imagination. Phronesis 41 (1):20-55.   (Google)
Von Burg, Alessandra Beasley (2010). Caught between history and imagination: Vico's ingenium for a rhetorical renovation of citizenship. Philosophy and Rhetoric 43 (1):pp. 26-53.   (Google)
Waibel, Violetta L. (2008). Structures of imagination in Fichte's wissenschaftslehre 1794-95 and 1804. In Daniel Breazeale & Tom Rockmore (eds.), After Jena: New Essays on Fichte's Later Philosophy. Northwestern University Press.   (Google)
Walton, Gilbert (1969). Imagination and confirmation. Mind 78 (312):580-587.   (Google | More links)
Walker, Jeremy (1969). Imagination and the passions. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 29 (4):575-588.   (Google | More links)
Warnock, Mary (1994). Imagination and Time. Blackwell.   (Google)
Weatherson, Brian (ms). Morality in fiction and consciousness in imagination.   (Cited by 2 | Google)
Wedin, Michael V. (1988). Mind and Imagination in Aristotle. Yale University Press.   (Google)
Werhane, Patricia H. (2006). A place for philosophers in applied ethics and the role of moral reasoning in moral imagination: A response to Richard Rorty. Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (3):401-408.   (Google)
Werhane, Patricia H. (2008). Mental models, moral imagination and system thinking in the age of globalization. Journal of Business Ethics 78 (3).   (Google)
White, Alan R. (1988). Imagining and pretending. Philosophical Investigations 11 (October):300-314.   (Cited by 1 | Google)
White, Alan R. (1989). Imaginary imagining. Analysis 49 (March):81-83.   (Cited by 1 | Google)
White, Alan R. (1990). The Language of Imagination. Cambridge: Blackwell.   (Cited by 27 | Google)
Wilbanks, Jan (1968). Hume's Theory of Imagination. The Hague, Martinus Nijhoff.   (Google)
Williams, Bernard (2006). Imagination and the self. In Problems of the Self. Cambridge University Press.   (Google)
Williamson, Timothy (1997). Imagination, stipulation and vagueness. Philosophical Issues 8:215-228.   (Google | More links)
Wilde, Tine (2002). The 4th Dimension. Wittgenstein on Colour and Imagination. In Christian Kanzian, Josef Quitterer & Edmund Runggaldier (eds.), Persons. An Interdisciplinary Approach. Papers of the 25th International Wittgenstein Symposium. Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society.   (Google)
Abstract: In this paper I first discuss the colour-octahedron and the position of this model as an idealized system with respect to the remarks on colour-concepts in Remarks on Colour (RC). The next part examines the notion of apsect seeing in the light of the colour-octahedron and RC. From there a connection is made with On Certainty (OC). By linking the remarks on colour, seeing aspects and certainty, it may become clear that the investigations of Wittgenstein concerning colour and certainty direct us towards a reflective dynamics and an anthropological interpretation of his ideas.
Winquist, Charles E. (1972). The Transcendental Imagination: An Essay in Philosophical Theology. The Hague,Nijhoff.   (Google)
Wood, David (2007). Part 3. the narrative imaginary. Double trouble: Narrative imagination as a carnival dragon. In Peter Gratton, John Panteleimon Manoussakis & Richard Kearney (eds.), Traversing the Imaginary: Richard Kearney and the Postmodern Challenge. Northwestern University Press.   (Google)
Woody, M. J. (2003). The unconscious as a hermeneutic myth: A defense of the imagination. In J. Philips & James Morley (eds.), Imagination and its Pathologies. MIT Press.   (Cited by 1 | Google)
Worsham, Lynn & Olson, Gary A. (eds.) (2007). The Politics of Possibility: Encountering the Radical Imagination. Paradigm Publishers.   (Google)
Wright, C. J. (1980). The 'spectre' of science. The study of optical phenomena and the romantic imagination. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 43:186-200.   (Google | More links)
Wurzer, John Wilhelm (2002). Enigmatic sayings. Review of the hypocritical imagination: Between Kant and Levinas by John Llewelyn. Research in Phenomenology 32 (1):233-237.   (Google)
Young, J. Michael (1984). Construction, schematism, and imagination. Topoi 3 (2).   (Google)
Young, John (2008). Inventing memory : Documentary and imagination in acousmatic music. In Mine Doğantan (ed.), Recorded Music: Philosophical and Critical Reflections. Middlesex University Press.   (Google)

5.1h.1 Imaginative Resistance

Driver, Julia (2008). Imaginative resistance and psychological necessity. Social Philosophy and Policy 25 (1):301-313.   (Google)
Gendler, Tamar Szabo (2006). Imaginative resistance revisited. In Shaun Nichols (ed.), The Architecture of the Imagination. Oxford University Press.   (Google)
Gendler, Tamar Szabó (2000). The puzzle of imaginative resistance. Journal of Philosophy 97 (2):55-81.   (Google | More links)
Levy, Neil (2005). Imaginative resistance and the moral/conventional distinction. Philosophical Psychology 18 (2):231 – 241.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: Children, even very young children, distinguish moral from conventional transgressions, inasmuch as they hold that the former, but not the latter, would still be wrong if there was no rule prohibiting them. Many people have taken this finding as evidence that morality is objective, and therefore universal. I argue that reflection on the phenomenon of imaginative resistance will lead us to question these claims. If a concept applies in virtue of the obtaining of a set of more basic facts, then it is authority independent, and we therefore resist the attempts of authorities to claim that it does not apply. Thus, the moral/conventional distinction is a product of imaginative resistance to claims that a concept does not apply when its supervenience base is in place (or vice versa). All we can rightfully conclude from the fact that children are disposed to make the moral/conventional distinction is that our moral concepts belong to the class of authority-independent concepts. Though the set of basic facts in virtue of which an authority-independent concept obtains must be objective, the concept itself might be conventional, inasmuch as we could easily draw its boundaries wider or narrower, or fail to have a concept that corresponds to these properties at all
Matravers, Derek (2003). Fictional assent and the (so-called) `puzzle of imaginative resistance'. In Matthew Kieran & Dominic McIver Lopes (eds.), Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts. Routledge.   (Google)
Mothersill, Mary (2006). Make-believe morality and fictional worlds. In José Luis Bermúdez & Sebastian Gardner (eds.), Arts and Morality. Routledge.   (Google)
Nichols, Shaun (ed.) (2006). The Architecture of the Imagination: New Essays on Pretence, Possibility, and Fiction. Oxford University Press.   (Cited by 2 | Google)
Abstract: This volume brings together specially written essays by leading researchers on the propositional imagination. This is the mental capacity we exploit when we imagine that Holmes has a bad habit or that there are zombies. It plays an essential role in philosophical theorizing, engaging with fiction, and indeed in everyday life. The Architecture of the Imagination capitalizes on recent attempts to give a cognitive account of this capacity, extending the theoretical picture and exploring the philosophical implications
Smuts, Aaron (2006). V. F. Perkins' Functional Credibility and the Problem of Imaginative Resistance. Film and Philosophy 10 (1):85-99.   (Google)
Abstract: Echoing Beardsley's trinity of unity, complexity, and intensity, Perkins develops three interrelated criteria on which to base an evaluation of film: credibility, coherence, and significance. I assess whether Perkins criteria of credibility serves as a useful standard for film criticism. Most of the effort will be devoted to charitably reconstructing the notion of credibility by bringing together some of Perkins' particular comments. Then I will briefly examine whether Perkins has successfully achieved his goal of developing standards of judgment by holding credibility up to his own criteria of successful meta-criticism: "The clarification of standards should help to develop the disciplines of criticism without seeking to lay obligations on the film-maker" (p. 59). Although I argue that Perkins fails to achieve his goal, his criterion of credibility remains a useful mechanism for evaluating artistic attempts to achieve a particular end, namely spectator immersion. A limited domain of application for his criteria might seem to leave us with little more than an idiosyncratic expression of his classicist artistic taste, but Film as Film also contains valuable insights relevant to the so called "problem of imaginative resistance."
Stock, Kathleen (2005). Resisting imaginative resistance. Philosophical Quarterly 55 (221):607–624.   (Google | More links)
Stokes, Dustin R. (2006). The evaluative character of imaginative resistance. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (4):287-405.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: A fiction may prescribe imagining that a pig can talk or tell the future. A fiction may prescribe imagining that torturing innocent persons is a good thing. We generally comply with imaginative prescriptions like the former, but not always with prescriptions like the latter: we imagine non-evaluative fictions without difficulty but sometimes resist imagining value-rich fictions. Thus arises the puzzle of imaginative resistance. Most analyses of the phenomenon focus on the content of the relevant imaginings. The present analysis focuses instead on the character of certain kinds of imaginings, arguing that we resist in such cases given the rich evaluative character of the imaginings prescribed, and the agent-dependent constraints on imagining in such ways
Stock, Kathleen (2003). The tower of goldbach and other impossible tales. In Matthew Kieran & Dominic McIver Lopes (eds.), Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts. Routledge.   (Google)
Todd, Cain Samuel (2009). Imaginability, morality, and fictional truth: Dissolving the puzzle of 'imaginative resistance'. Philosophical Studies 143 (2):187-211.   (Google)
Abstract: This paper argues that there is no genuine puzzle of ‘imaginative resistance’. In part 1 of the paper I argue that the imaginability of fictional propositions is relative to a range of different factors including the ‘thickness’ of certain concepts, and certain pre-theoretical and theoretical commitments. I suggest that those holding realist moral commitments may be more susceptible to resistance and inability than those holding non-realist commitments, and that it is such realist commitments that ultimately motivate the problem. However, I argue that the relativity of imaginability is not a particularly puzzling feature of imagination. In part 2, I claim that it is the so-called ‘alethic’ puzzle, concerning fictional truth, which generates a real puzzle about imaginative resistance. However, I argue that the alethic puzzle itself depends on certain realist assumptions about the nature of fictional truth which are implausible and should be rejected in favour of an interpretive view of fictional truth. Once this is done, I contend, it becomes evident that the supposed problem of imaginative resistance as it has hitherto been discussed in the literature is not puzzling at all
Walton, Kendall Lewis (1994). Morals in fiction and fictional morality (I). Proceedings of Aristotelian Society:27-50.   (Google)
Walton, Kendall Lewis (2006). On the (so-called) puzzle of imaginative resistance. In Shaun Nichols (ed.), The Architecture of the Imagination. Oxford University Press.   (Google)
Weatherson, Brian (2004). Morality, fiction, and possibility. Philosophers' Imprint 4 (3):1-27.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: Authors have a lot of leeway with regard to what they can make true in their story. In general, if the author says that p is true in the fiction we’re reading, we believe that p is true in that fiction. And if we’re playing along with the fictional game, we imagine that, along with everything else in the story, p is true. But there are exceptions to these general principles. Many authors, most notably Kendall Walton and Tamar Szabó Gendler, have discussed apparent counterexamples when p is “morally deviant”. Many other statements that are conceptually impossible also seem to be counterexamples. In this paper I do four things. I survey the range of counterexamples, or at least putative counterexamples, to the principles. Then I look to explanations of the counterexamples. I argue, following Gendler, that the explanation cannot simply be that morally deviant claims are impossible. I argue that the distinctive attitudes we have towards moral propositions cannot explain the counterexamples, since some of the examples don’t involve moral concepts. And I put forward a proposed explanation that turns on the role of ‘higher-level concepts’, concepts that if they are satisfied are satisfied in virtue of more fundamental facts about the world, in fiction, and in imagination

5.1h.2 Imagination and Imagery

Abell, Catharine & Currie, Gregory (1999). Internal and external pictures. Philosophical Psychology 12 (4):429-445.   (Cited by 2 | Google | More links)
Abstract: What do pictures and mental images have in common? The contemporary tendency to reject mental picture theories of imagery suggests that the answer is: not much. We show that pictures and visual imagery have something important in common. They both contribute to mental simulations: pictures as inputs and mental images as outputs. But we reject the idea that mental images involve mental pictures, and we use simulation theory to strengthen the anti-pictorialist's case. Along the way we try to account for caricature and for some basic features of pictorial representations
Byrne, Alex (2010). Recollection, perception, imagination. Philosophical Studies 148 (1).   (Google | More links)
Abstract: Remembering a cat sleeping (specifically, recollecting the way the cat looked), perceiving (specifically, seeing) a cat sleeping, and imagining (specifically, visualizing) a cat sleeping are of course importantly different. Nonetheless, from the first-person perspective they are palpably alike. Our first question is
Casey, Edward S. (1971). Imagination: Imagining and the image. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 31 (June):475-490.   (Cited by 1 | Google | More links)
Gendler, Tamar Szabó (2006). Imaginative contagion. Metaphilosophy 37 (2):183-203.   (Cited by 1 | Google | More links)
Abstract: The aim of this article is to expand the diet of examples considered in philosophical discussions of imagination and pretense, and to offer some preliminary observations about what we might learn about the nature of imagination as a result. The article presents a number of cases involving imaginative contagion: cases where merely imagining or pretending that P has effects that we would expect only perceiving or believing that P to have. Examples are offered that involve visual imagery, motor imagery, fictional emotions, and social priming. It is suggested that imaginative contagion is a more prevalent phenomenon than has typically been recognized
Gregory, Dominic (forthcoming). Imagery, the imagination and experience. Philosophical Quarterly.   (Google)
Abstract: Visualizings, the simplest imaginings which employ visual imagery, have certain characteristic features; they are perspectival, for instance. Also, it seems that some but not all of our visualizings are imaginings of seeings. But it has been forcefully argued, for example by M.G.F. Martin and Christopher Peacocke, that all visualizings are imaginings of visual sensations. I block these arguments by providing an account of visualizings which allows for their perspectival nature and other features they typically have, but which also explains how we can visualize things without thereby imagining visual sensations
Jones, Mostyn W. (1995). Inadequacies in current theories of imagination. Southern Journal of Philosophy 33 (3):313-333.   (Google)
Abstract: Interest in imagination dates back to Plato and Aristotle, but full-length works have been devoted to it only relatively recently by Sartre, McKellar, Furlong, Casey, Johnson, Warnock, Brann, and others. Despite their length and variety, however, these current theories take overly narrow views of this complex phenomenon. (1) Their definitions of “imagination” neglect the multiplicity of its meanings and tend to focus narrowly on the power of imaging alone (which produces images and imagery). But imagination in the fullest, most encompassing sense centers instead on creativity, which involves both imaging and reasoning powers. (2) Current accounts of the operations of imagination narrowly construe it in fixed, immutable terms. But it’s instead a dynamic, evolving synergy of its psychological roots (images and symbols) and sociobiological roots (cultures and instincts). This synergy has transformed the roles of images and symbols in imagination (as Vygotsky, Goody, etc. note). For example, in the shift from mytheopic to scientific imagination, literacy and formal education fostered abstract symbolic thinking (reason), which differs from mytheopic thinking based on richly concrete associations (imagery). The result was “more than cool reason”, but experimental studies (by Perkins, Clement, etc.) show that it’s also more than just dreamy imagery. It’s a dynamic synergy of the two that has transformed both. (3) Current evaluations of imagination’s potentials are also narrow. They tend to focus on its role in mental life while ignoring social and political life. Also, they tend to follow romantic and existentialist customs of extolling imagination’s virtues without soberly critiquing its limitations. Again, they ignore the synergy of psychological, sociological and biological forces that shape mental and social evolution, and promote and constrain imagination in complex ways. For example, Sartre surreally asks us to choose our own nature with an imagination emancipated from institutional and instinctual strictures. Yet making intelligible choices depends on these strictures. (4) In conclusion, current theories define imagination narrowly in terms of imaging, they describe its operations in fixed and immutable terms, and they evaluate its potentials without examining the full interplay of forces shaping it. These shortcomings are remedied by a broader perspective that defines imagination more adequately and comprehensively, and that recognizes it’s complex roots, dynamic operations, and evolving potentials.
Joyce, P. (2003). Imagining experiences correctly. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (3):361-370.   (Google | More links)
Kind, Amy (online). Imagery and imagination.   (Google)
Abstract: Both imagery and imagination play an important part in our mental lives. This article, which has three main sections, discusses both of these phenomena, and the connection between them. The first part discusses mental images and, in particular, the dispute about their representational nature that has become known as the _imagery debate_ . The second part turns to the faculty of the imagination, discussing the long philosophical tradition linking mental imagery and the imagination—a tradition that came under attack in the early part of the twentieth century with the rise of behaviorism. Finally, the third part of this article examines modal epistemology, where the imagination has been thought to serve an important philosophical function, namely, as a guide to possibility
Kind, Amy (2001). Putting the image back in imagination. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):85-110.   (Cited by 6 | Google | More links)
Abstract: Despite their intuitive appeal and a long philosophical history, imagery-based accounts of the imagination have fallen into disfavor in contemporary discussions. The philosophical pressure to reject such accounts seems to derive from two distinct sources. First, the fact that mental images have proved difficult to accommodate within a scientific conception of mind has led to numerous attempts to explain away their existence, and this in turn has led to attempts to explain the phenomenon of imagining without reference to such ontologically dubious entities as mental images. Second, even those philosophers who accept mental images in their ontology have worried about what seem to be fairly obvious examples of imaginings that occur without imagery. In this paper, I aim to relieve both these points of philosophical pressure and, in the process, develop a new imagery-based account of the imagination: the imagery model
Nanay, Bence (forthcoming). Perception and imagination: Amodal perception as mental imagery. Philosophical Studies.   (Google)
Abstract: When we see an object, we also represent those parts of it that are not visible. The question is how we represent them: this is the problem of amodal perception. I will consider three possible accounts: (a) we see them, (b) we have non-perceptual beliefs about them and (c) we have immediate perceptual access to them, and point out that all of these views face both empirical and conceptual objections. I suggest and defend a fourth account, according to which we represent the occluded parts of perceived objects by means of mental imagery. This conclusion could be thought of as a (weak) version of the Strawsonian dictum, according to which “imagination is a necessary ingredient of perception itself”
Shorter, J. M. (1952). Imagination. Mind 61 (October):528-542.   (Cited by 3 | Google | More links)
Thomas, Nigel J. T. (ms). Are There People Who Do Not Experience Imagery? (And why does it matter?).   (Google)
Abstract: To the best of my knowledge, with the exception of Galton's original work (1880, 1883), Sommer's brief case study (1978), and Faw's (1997, 2009) articles, this is the only really substantial discussion of the phenomenon of non-brain-damaged "non-imagers" available anywhere.
Thomas, Nigel J. T. (ms). Coding dualism: Conscious thought without cartesianism or computationalism.   (Google)
Abstract: The principal temptation toward substance dualisms, or otherwise incorporating a question begging homunculus into our psychologies, arises not from the problem of consciousness in general, nor from the problem of intentionality, but from the question of our awareness and understanding of our own mental contents, and the control of the deliberate, conscious thinking in which we employ them. Dennett has called this "Hume's problem". Cognitivist philosophers have generally either denied the experiential reality of thought, as did the Behaviorists, or have taken an implicitly epiphenomenalist stance, a form of dualism. Some sort of mental duality may indeed be required to meet this problem, but not one that is metaphysical or question begging. I argue that it can be solved in the light of Paivio's "Dual Coding" theory of mental representation. This theory, which is strikingly simple and intuitive (perhaps too much so to have caught the imagination of philosophers) has demonstrated impressive empirical power and scope. It posits two distinct systems of potentially conscious representations in the human mind: mental imagery and verbal representation (which is not to be confused with 'propositional' or "mentalese" representation). I defend, on conceptual grounds, Paivio's assertion of precisely two codes against interpretations which would either multiply image codes to match sense modes, or collapse the two, admittedly interacting, systems into one. On this basis I argue that the inference that a conscious agent would be needed to read such mental representations and to manipulate them in the light of their contents can be pre-empted by an account of how the two systems interact, each registering, affecting and being affected by developing associative processes within the other
Thomas, Nigel J. T. (online). Imagination. Dictionary of Philosophy of Mind.   (Google)
Abstract: A brief historical and conceptual account of the concept of imagination
Thomas, Nigel J. T. (2005). Mental Imagery, Philosophical Issues About. In Lynn Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science, Volume 2, pp. 1147-1153.   (Google)
Abstract: An introduction to the science and philosophy of mental imagery.
Thomas, Nigel J. T., The multidimensional spectrum of imagination:.   (Google)
Abstract: A comprehensive theory of the structure and cognitive function of the human imagination, and its relationship to perceptual experience, is developed, largely through a critique of the account propounded in Colin McGinn's Mindsight. McGinn eschews the highly deflationary (and unilluminating) views of imagination common amongst analytical philosophers, but fails to develop his own account satisfactorily because (owing to a scientifically outmoded understanding of visual perception) he draws an excessively sharp, qualitative distinction between imagination and perception (following Wittgenstein, Sartre, and others), and because of his fatally flawed, empirically ungrounded conception of hallucination. In fact, however, an understanding of perception informed by modern visual science will enable us to unify our accounts of perception, mental imagery, dreaming, hallucination, creativity, and other aspects of imagination within a single coherent theoretical framework
White, Alan R. (1987). Visualizing and imagining seeing. Analysis 47 (October):221-224.   (Cited by 1 | Google)

5.1h.3 Imagination and Pretense

Blaauw, Martijn (2006). Belief and pretense: A reply to Gendler. Metaphilosophy 37 (2):204-209.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: In cases of imaginative contagion, imagining something has doxastic or doxastic-like consequences. In this reply to Tamar Szabó Gendler's article in this collection, I investigate what the philosophical consequences of these cases could be. I argue (i) that imaginative contagion has consequences for how we should understand the nature of imagination and (ii) that imaginative contagion has consequences for our understanding of what belief-forming mechanisms there are. Along the way, I make some remarks about what the consequences of the contagion cases are for the relation between knowledge and imagination
Bogdan, Radu J. (2005). Pretending as imaginative rehearsal for cultural conformity. Journal of Cognition and Culture 5 (1-2):191-213.   (Cited by 1 | Google | More links)
Carruthers, Peter (2003). Review of Gregory Currie, Ian Ravenscroft, Recreative Minds: Imagination in Philosophy and Psychology. Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (11).   (Google)
Currie, Gregory (2002). Desire in imagination. In Tamar S. Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.), Conceivability and Possibility. Oxford University Press.   (Cited by 6 | Google)
Currie, Gregory (2002). Imagination as motivation. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 102 (3):201-16.   (Cited by 3 | Google | More links)
Currie, Gregory (1995). Imagination as simulation: Aesthetics meets cognitive science. In Martin Davies & Tony Stone (eds.), Mental Simulation. Blackwell.   (Cited by 29 | Google)
Currie, Gregory & Ravenscroft, Ian (2002). Recreative Minds: Imagination in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press.   (Cited by 90 | Google | More links)
Abstract: Recreative Minds develops a philosophical theory of imagination that draws upon the latest work in psychology. This theory illuminates the use of imagination in coming to terms with art, its role in enabling us to live as social beings, and the psychological consequences of disordered imagination. The authors offer a lucid exploration of a fascinating subject
Doggett, Tyler & Egan, Andy (2007). Wanting things you don't want: The case for an imaginative analogue of desire. Philosophers' Imprint 7 (9):1-17.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: You’re imagining, in the course of a different game of make-believe, that you’re a bank robber. You don’t believe that you’re a bank robber. You are moved to point your finger, gun-wise, at the person pretending to be the bank teller and say, “Stick ‘em up! This is a robbery!”
Egan, Andy (2008). Pretense for the complete idiom. Noûs 42 (3):381-409.   (Google | More links)
Friend, Stacie (2007). Review of Shaun Nichols (ed.), The Architecture of the Imagination: New Essays on Pretence, Possibility, and Fiction. Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (4).   (Google)
Funkhouser, Eric & Spaulding, Shannon (2009). Imagination and other scripts. Philosophical Studies 143 (3):291-314.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: One version of the Humean Theory of Motivation holds that all actions can be causally explained by reference to a belief–desire pair. Some have argued that pretense presents counter-examples to this principle, as pretense is instead causally explained by a belief-like imagining and a desire-like imagining. We argue against this claim by denying imagination the power of motivation. Still, we allow imagination a role in guiding action as a script . We generalize the script concept to show how things besides imagination can occupy this same role in both pretense and non-pretense actions. The Humean Theory of Motivation should then be modified to cover this script role
Gendler, Tamar (2002). Review of Paul Harris, The Work of the Imagination. Mind 111 (442):414-418.   (Google)
Abstract: I had a structural worry about the relation of Gaita’s three chapters on truth, interesting though these chapters are, to the rest of Gaita’s project. And I had some residual questions left after reading the book: What are persons? How do we know when we are encountering one, and when are we justified (we must be sometimes: compare the various sorts of animal) in a decision that something we encounter is not a person? Do evil actions always involve a sort of blindness to what is being done? If so, how easy is it to explain how agents who do evil can be held responsible for their cognitive deficiencies? These may of course be questions that Gaita was not trying to answer; but in any case, as I hope I have conveyed, I found A Common Humanity a striking and revelatory read, and I warmly recommend it
Gendler, Tamar Szabó (2006). Imaginative contagion. Metaphilosophy 37 (2):183-203.   (Cited by 1 | Google | More links)
Abstract: The aim of this article is to expand the diet of examples considered in philosophical discussions of imagination and pretense, and to offer some preliminary observations about what we might learn about the nature of imagination as a result. The article presents a number of cases involving imaginative contagion: cases where merely imagining or pretending that P has effects that we would expect only perceiving or believing that P to have. Examples are offered that involve visual imagery, motor imagery, fictional emotions, and social priming. It is suggested that imaginative contagion is a more prevalent phenomenon than has typically been recognized
Gendler, Tamar Szabó (2003). On the relation between pretense and belief. In Imagination Philosophy and the Arts. Routledge.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: By the age of two, children are able to engage in highly elaborate games of symbolic pretense, in which objects and actions in the actual world are taken to stand for objects and actions in a realm of make-believe. These games of pretense are marked by the presence of two central features, which I will call quarantining and mirroring (see also Leslie 1987; Perner 1991). Quarantining is manifest to the extent that events within the pretense-episode are taken to have effects only within that pretense-episode (e.g. the child does not expect that ‘spilling’ ( pretend) ‘tea’1 will result in the table really being wet), or more generally, to the extent that proto-beliefs and proto-attitudes concerning the pretended state of affairs are not treated as beliefs and attitudes relevant to guiding action in the actual world. Mirroring is manifest to the extent that features of the imaginary situation that have not been explicitly stipulated are derivable via features of their real-world analogues (e.g. the child does expect that if she up-ends the teapot above the table, then the table will become wet in the pretense), or, more generally to the extent that imaginative content is taken to be governed by the same sorts of restrictions that govern believed content
Gendler, Tamar Szabó (2002). Review: The work of the imagination. Mind 111 (442).   (Google)
Gendler, Tamar (2007). Self-deception as pretense. Philosophical Perspectives 21 (1):231–258.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: I propose that paradigmatic cases of self-deception satisfy the following conditions: (a) the person who is self-deceived about not-P pretends (in the sense of makes-believe or imagines or fantasizes) that not-P is the case, often while believing that P is the case and not believing that not-P is the case; (b) the pretense that not-P largely plays the role normally played by belief in terms of (i) introspective vivacity and (ii) motivation of action in a wide range of circumstances. Understanding self-deception in this way is highly natural. And it provides a non-
paradoxical characterization of the phenomenon that explains both its distinctive patterns of instability and its ordinary association with irrationality. Why, then, has this diagnosis been overlooked? I suggest that the oversight is due to a failure to recognize the philosophical significance of a crucial fact about the human mind, namely, the degree to which attitudes other than belief often play a central role in our mental and practical lives, both by “influenc[ing our]. . . passions and imagination,” and by “governing. . .our actions.”
Goldie, Peter (2004). Recreative minds: Imagination in philosophy and psychology by Gregory Currie and Ian Ravenscroft, oxford: Clarendon press, 2002, pp. 233; ISBN 0 19 823809 6 (pbb) ??XX.Xx. Philosophy 79 (2):331-335.   (Google)
Harris, Paul L. (1995). Imagining and pretending. In Mental Simulation. Cambridge: Blackwell.   (Cited by 7 | Google)
Harris, Paul (2000). The Work of the Imagination. Wiley-Blackwell.   (Google)
Heal, Jane (2003). Mind, Reason, and Imagination: Selected Essays in Philosophy of Mind and Language. Cambridge University Press.   (Cited by 4 | Google | More links)
Abstract: Recent philosophy of mind has had a mistaken conception of the nature of psychological concepts. It has assumed too much similarity between psychological judgments and those of natural science and has thus overlooked the fact that other people are not just objects whose thoughts we may try to predict and control but fellow creatures with whom we talk and co-operate. In this collection of essays, Jane Heal argues that central to our ability to arrive at views about others' thoughts is not knowledge of some theory of the mind but rather an ability to imagine alternative worlds and how things appear from another person's point of view. She then applies this view to questions of how we represent others' thoughts, the shape of psychological concepts, the nature of rationality and the possibility of first person authority. This book should appeal to students and professionals in philosophy of mind and language
Liggins, David (forthcoming). The autism objection to pretence theories. Philosophical Quarterly.   (Google)
Abstract: A pretence theory of a discourse is one which claims that we do not believe or assert the propositions expressed by the sentences we utter when taking part in the discourse: instead, we are speaking from within a pretence. Jason Stanley argues that if a pretence account of a discourse is correct, people with autism should be incapable of successful participation in it; but since people with autism are capable of participiating successfully in the discourses which pretence theorists aim to account for, all these accounts should be rejected. I discuss how pretence theorists can respond, and apply this discussion to two pretence theories, Stephen Yablo's account of arithmetic and Kendall Walton's account of negative existentials. I show how Yablo and Walton can escape Stanley's objection
Nichols, Shaun (2002). Imagination and the puzzles of iteration. Analysis 62 (3):182-87.   (Cited by 4 | Google | More links)
Abstract: Iteration presents opposing puzzles for a theory of the imagination. The first puzzle, noted by David Lewis, is that when a person pretends to pretend, the iteration is often preserved. Let’s call this the puzzle of ‘pre- served iteration’. At the other pole, Gregory Currie has noted that very often when we pretend to pretend, the iteration does collapse. We might call this the puzzle of ‘collapsed iteration’. Somehow a theory of the imagination must be able to address these two puzzles. I argue that an empirically inspired cognitive theory of the imagination (Nichols & Stich 2000) can accommodate both puzzles
Nichols, Shaun (ed.) (2006). The Architecture of the Imagination: New Essays on Pretence, Possibility, and Fiction. Oxford University Press.   (Cited by 2 | Google)
Abstract: This volume brings together specially written essays by leading researchers on the propositional imagination. This is the mental capacity we exploit when we imagine that Holmes has a bad habit or that there are zombies. It plays an essential role in philosophical theorizing, engaging with fiction, and indeed in everyday life. The Architecture of the Imagination capitalizes on recent attempts to give a cognitive account of this capacity, extending the theoretical picture and exploring the philosophical implications
Van Leeuwen, Neil (2011). Imagination is where the action is. Journal of Philosophy 108 (2).   (Google | More links)
Abstract: Imaginative representations are crucial to the generation of action--both pretense and plain action. But well-known theories of imagination on offer in the literature [1] fail to describe how perceptually-formatted imaginings (mental images) and motor imaginings function in the generation of action and [2] fail to recognize the important fact that spatially rich imagining can be integrated into one's perceptual manifold. In this paper, I present a theory of imagining that shows how spatially rich imagining functions in the generation of action. I also describe the imaginative structures behind two under-explored forms of action: semi-pretense and pretense layering. In addition, I suggest that my theory of imagining meshes better than the competitors with current work in cognitive and affective neuroscience.
van Leeuwen, D. S. Neil (2009). The Motivational Role of Belief. Philosophical Papers 38 (2):219 - 246.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: This paper claims that the standard characterization of the motivational role of belief should be supplemented. Beliefs do not only, jointly with desires, cause and rationalize actions that will satisfy the desires, if the beliefs are true; beliefs are also the practical ground of other cognitive attitudes, like imagining, which means beliefs determine whether and when one acts with those other attitudes as the cognitive inputs into choices and practical reasoning. In addition to arguing for this thesis, I take issue with Velleman's argument that belief and imagining cannot be distinguished on the basis of motivational role.
Walton, Kendall L. (1991). Précis of mimesis as make-believe: On the foundations of the representational arts. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (2):379-382.   (Google | More links)
Zeimbekis, John, Thought experiments and mental simulations.   (Google)
Abstract: Thought experiments have a mysterious way of informing us about the world, apparently without examining it, yet with a great degree of certainty. It is tempting to try to explain this capacity by making use of the idea that in thought experiments, the mind somehow simulates the processes about which it reaches conclusions. Here, I test this idea. I argue that when they predict the outcomes of hypothetical physical situations, thought experiments cannot simulate physical processes. They use mental models, which should not be confused with process-driven simulations. A convincing case can be made that thought experiments about hypothetical mental processes are mental simulations. Concerning moral thought experiments, I argue that construing them as simulations of mental processes favours certain moral theories over others. The scope of mental simulation in thought experiments is primarily limited by the constraint of relevant similarity on source and target processes: on one hand, this constraint disqualifies thought from simulating external natural processes; on the other hand, it is a source of epistemic bias in moral thought experiments. In view of these results, I conclude that thought experiments and mental simulations cannot be assimilated as means of acquiring knowledge.

5.1h.4 Imagination, Misc

Almeida, Michael J. (2008). The enlargement of life: Moral imagination at work – John Kekes. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (231):374–377.   (Google | More links)
Aquila, Richard E. (1988). Self-consciousness, self-determination, and imagination in Kant. Topoi 7 (1).   (Google)
Abstract:   I argue for a basically Sartrean approach to the idea that one''s self-concept, and any form of knowledge of oneself as an individual subject, presupposes concepts and knowledge about other things. The necessity stems from a pre-conceptual structure which assures that original self-consciousness is identical with one''s consciousness of objects themselves. It is not a distinct accomplishment merely dependent on the latter. The analysis extends the matter/form distinction to concepts. It also requires a distinction between two notions of consciousness: one relates to the employment of already formed concepts, the other to the structures of imaginative apprehension that help to constitute (empirical) concepts from the start. We need to see that (1) so far as objects are only conceptualized appearances, the material through which we apprehend them must be reflected in that apprehension itself; (2) the corresponding material consists of a manifold of pre-conceptually active anticipations and retentions concerning the course of one''s own experience. The resultant structure imposes an orientation on the world of appearances that does not derive from a concept of oneself as an individual in it, but that nevertheless provides the only possible basis for such a concept. One''s self-concept, at least as empirical subject, is simply that ofwhatever subject is indicated, in an appropriate way, by that orientation
Babbitt, Susan E. (1996). Impossible Dreams: Rationality, Integrity, and Moral Imagination. Westview Press.   (Google)
Abstract: Conventional wisdom and commonsense morality tend to take the integrity of persons for granted. But for people in systematically unjust societies, self-respect and human dignity may prove to be impossible dreams.Susan Babbitt explores the implications of this insight, arguing that in the face of systemic injustice, individual and social rationality may require the transformation rather than the realization of deep-seated aims, interests, and values. In particular, under such conditions, she argues, the cultivation and ongoing exercise of moral imagination is necessary to discover and defend a more humane social vision. Impossible Dreams is one of those rare books that fruitfully combines discourses that were previously largely separate: feminist and antiracist political theory, analytic ethics and philosophy of mind, and a wide range of non-philosophical literature on the lives of oppressed peoples around the world. It is both an object lesson in reaching across academic barriers and a demonstration of how the best of feminist philosophy can be in conversation with the best of “mainstream” philosophy—as well as affect the lives of real people
Banham, Gary (2005). Kant's Transcendental Imagination. Palgrave Macmillan.   (Google)
Abstract: The role and place of transcendental psychology in Kant's Critique of Pure Reason has been a source of some contention. This work presents a detailed argument for restoring transcendental psychology to a central place in the interpretation of Kant's Analytic, in the process providing a detailed response to more "austere" analytic readings
Blocker, H. Gene (1972). Another look at aesthetic imagination. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 30 (4):529-536.   (Google | More links)
Blocker, Harry (1965). Kant's theory of the relation of imagination and understanding in aesthetic judgements of taste. British Journal of Aesthetics 5 (1).   (Google)
Blunt, Anthony (1943). Blake's pictorial imagination. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 6:190-212.   (Google | More links)
Brady, Emily (1998). Imagination and the aesthetic appreciation of nature. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (2):139-147.   (Google | More links)
Brumbaugh, Robert Sherrick (1954). Plato's Mathematical Imagination. Bloomington, Indiana University Press.   (Google)
Bundy, Murray Wright (1927). The Theory of Imagination in Classical and Mediaeval Thought. R. West.   (Google)
Abstract: Pre-Socratic philosophy. - Plato. - Aristotle. - Post-Aristotelian philosophy. - The Theory of art: Quintilian, Longinus, and Philostratus. - Plotinus. - The lesser Neoplatonists. - Neoplatonic views of three early Christians. - Mediaeval descriptive psychology. - The psychology of the mystics. - Dante's theory of vision. - Conclusion.
Byrne, Alex (2010). Recollection, perception, imagination. Philosophical Studies 148 (1).   (Google | More links)
Abstract: Remembering a cat sleeping (specifically, recollecting the way the cat looked), perceiving (specifically, seeing) a cat sleeping, and imagining (specifically, visualizing) a cat sleeping are of course importantly different. Nonetheless, from the first-person perspective they are palpably alike. Our first question is
Carrier, David (1973). Three kinds of imagination. Journal of Philosophy 70 (22):819-831.   (Google | More links)
Casey, Edward S. (1976). Comparative phenomenology of mental activity: Memory, hallucination, and fantasy contrasted with imagination. Research in Phenomenology 6 (1):1-25.   (Google)
Casey, John (1984). Emotion and imagination. Philosophical Quarterly 34 (134):1-14.   (Google | More links)
Casey, Edward S. (1976). Imagining: A Phenomenological Study. Indiana University Press.   (Cited by 36 | Google | More links)
Casey, Edward S. (1977). Imagining and remembering. Review of Metaphysics 31 (December):187-209.   (Cited by 3 | Google)
Casey, Edward S. (2003). Imagination, fantasy, hallucination, and memory. In J. Philips & James Morley (eds.), Imagination and its Pathologies. MIT Press.   (Google)
Casey, Edward S. (1971). Imagination: Imagining and the image. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 31 (June):475-490.   (Cited by 1 | Google | More links)
Casey, Edward S. (1978). Imagining, perceiving, and thinking. Humanitas 14 (May):173-196.   (Google)
Castoriadis, Cornelius (1997). World in Fragments: Writings on Politics, Society, Psychoanalysis, and the Imagination. Stanford University Press.   (Google)
Abstract: This collection presents a broad and compelling overview of the most recent work by a world-renowned figure in contemporary thought. The book is in four parts: Koinonia, Polis, Psyche, Logos. The opening section begins with a general introduction to the author's views on being, time, creation, and the imaginary institution of society and continues with reflections on the role of the individual psyche in racist thinking and acting. The second part is a critique of those who now belittle and distort the meaning of May 1968 and other movements of the sixties as well as the French Revolution. In part three, Castoriadis shows how psychoanalysis, like politics, can contribute to the project of individual and collective autonomy and challenges Lacan, Foucault, and Derrida, and others in his report on 'The State and Subject Today'. Finally he examines how Aristotle's original aporetic discovery and cover-up of the imagination were repeated by Kant, Freud, Heidegger, and even Merleau-Ponty
Chambliss, J. J. (1974). Imagination and Reason in Plato, Aristotle, Vico, Rousseau, and Keats. The Hague,Nijhoff.   (Google)
Choi, Jinhee (2005). Leaving it up to the imagination: POV shots and imagining from the inside. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (1):17–25.   (Google | More links)
Church, Jennifer (2003). Depression, depth, and the imagination. In J. Philips & James Morley (eds.), Imagination and its Pathologies. MIT Press.   (Google)
Ciulla, Joanne B. (1996). Business leadership and moral imagination in the twenty-first century. In Andrew R. Cecil & W. Lawson Taitte (eds.), Moral Values: The Challenge of the Twenty-First Century. Distributed by the University of Texas Press.   (Google)
Clausen, Christopher (1986). The Moral Imagination: Essays on Literature and Ethics. University of Iowa Press.   (Google)
Coates, Paul (2009). Perception, imagination and demonstrative reference : A Sellarsian account. In Willem A. DeVries (ed.), Empiricism, Perceptual Knowledge, Normativity, and Realism: Essays on Wilfrid Sellars. Oxford University Press.   (Google)
Coble, Don Kelly (1997). Nietzsche, the imagination, and its multiple drives. Research in Phenomenology 27 (1):270-277.   (Google)
Cocking, J. M. (1991). Imagination: A Study in the History of Ideas. Routledge.   (Google)
Abstract: Many writers have paid tribute to its power: Shakespeare urged his audiences to use it to create a setting; Hobbes asserted that "imagination and memory are but one thing;" for Wordsworth it was "the mightiest leveler known to moral world;" and to Baudelaire it represented "the queen of truth." Imagination as artistic, poetic, and cultural predicate remains one of the most influential ideas in the history of Western thought. It has been simultaneously feared as a dangerous, uncontrollable force, and revered as the supreme visionary power. The questions of its origins, nature, function, and effects have absorbed writers, theologians, and philosophers alike. J. M. Cocking's Imagination shows how these questions have recurred, through the ages and in various cultures. Exploring this theme, from antiquity to the Renaissance, it opens with a discussion of the treatment of imagination in the writings of Aristotle and Plato. Tracing its development in the Middle Ages, Cocking pays particular attention to the parallel tradition in Islamic thought of the period. The book pursues the concept through the theories of Dante and the neo-Platonists, concluding with the High Renaissance
Coeckelbergh, Mark (2007). Imagination and Principles: An Essay on the Role of Imagination in Moral Reasoning. Palgrave Macmillan.   (Google)
Abstract: What does it mean to say that imagination plays a role in moral reasoning, and what are the theoretical and practical implications? Engaging with three traditions in moral theory and confronting them with three contexts of moral practice, this book offers a more comprehensive framework to think about these questions. The author develops an argument about the relation between imagination and principles that moves beyond competition metaphors and center-periphery schemas. He shows that both cooperate and are equally necessary to cope with moral problems, and combines insights of different theories and disciplines to explore how this works in practice
Coeckelbergh, Mark (2007). Principles or imagination? Two approaches to global justice. Journal of Global Ethics 3 (2):203 – 221.   (Google)
Abstract: What does it mean to introduce the notion of imagination in the discussion about global justice? What is gained by studying the role of imagination in thinking about global justice? Does a focus on imagination imply that we must replace existing influential principle-centred approaches such as that of John Rawls and his critics? We can distinguish between two approaches to global justice. One approach is Rawlsian and Kantian in inspiration. Discussions within this tradition typically focus on the question whether Rawls's theory of justice (1971), designed for the national level, can or should be applied to the global level. Can and should Rawls's Difference Principle be globalized, as Thomas Pogge argues? Is this proposal superior to Rawls's Law of Peoples (1999)? Another approach to global justice has been developed by Martha Nussbaum in Cultivating Humanity (1997), Poetic Justice (1995), and other work. I will construct her view and critically examine it by looking at her arguments about the relation between empathy, literature, and global justice. At first sight, these two approaches seem to be opposed. The former puts an emphasis on principles, universal reason, and the moral aspects of institutions and their policies, whereas the latter is rather concerned with the relation between imagination and justice, with the particular, and with the individual moral development. But is this necessarily so? I will show that both approaches could benefit from each other's insights to strengthen their own position. Moreover, I will argue for middle way between, or an integration of the two approaches that combines principles and imagination. In this way, we can move towards a more comprehensive account of global justice
Coeckelbergh, Mark & Mesman, Jessica (2007). With hope and imagination: Imaginative moral decision-making in neonatal intensive care units. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (1).   (Google)
Abstract:   Although the role of imagination in moral reasoning is often neglected, recent literature, mostly of pragmatist signature, points to imagination as one of its central elements. In this article we develop some of their arguments by looking at the moral role of imagination in practice, in particular the practice of neonatal intensive care. Drawing on empirical research, we analyze a decision-making process in various stages: delivery, staff meeting, and reflection afterwards. We show how imagination aids medical practitioners demarcating moral categories, tuning their actions, and exploring long-range consequences of decisions. We argue that imagination helps to bring about at least four kinds of integration in the moral decision-making process: personal integration by creating a moral self-image in moments of reflection; social integration by aiding the conciliation of the diverging perspectives of the people involved; temporal integration by facilitating the parties to transcend the present moment and connect past, present, and future; and epistemological integration by helping to combine the various forms of knowledge and experience needed to make moral decisions. Furthermore, we argue that the role of imagination in these moral decision-processes is limited in several significant ways. Rather than being a solution itself, it is merely an aid and cannot replace the decision itself. Finally, there are also limits to the practical relevance of this theoretical reflection. In the end, it is up to care professionals as reflective practitioners to re-imagine the practice of intensive care and make the right decisions with hope and imagination
Cornell, Drucilla (1993). Transformations: Recollective Imagination and Sexual Difference. Routledge.   (Google)
Abstract: At a time when the political left have watched the apparent decline of socialism, and with it the cynical rejection of political hope, the question of how to rethink political transformation has become a pressing question. In Transformations Drucilla Cornell offers us a unique conception of recollective imagination which allows us to preserve and re-articulate the tradition of critical social theory. Cornell argues that psychoanalysis must play a role in social theory because we need to understand the connection between our constitution as gendered subjects and social, political and legal transformation. We cannot avoid the question of how the subject is constituted if we are to provide a new conception of radical change. A remarkable work combining the insights of recent feminist and critical theory with the concerns for social change
Crick, Nathan (2004). Conquering our imagination: Thought experiments and enthymemes in scientific argument. Philosophy and Rhetoric 37 (1).   (Google)
Crittenden, Charles (2007). Review of Stephen Mulhall, Wittgenstein's Private Language: Grammar, Nonsense, and Imagination in Philosophical Investigations, ##243-315. Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (5).   (Google)
Currie, Gregory (2000). Imagination, delusion and hallucinations. In Max Coltheart & Martin Davies (eds.), Pathologies of Belief. Blackwell.   (Cited by 21 | Google | More links)
Currie, Gregory & Ravenscroft, Ian (2002). Recreative Minds: Imagination in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press.   (Cited by 90 | Google | More links)
Abstract: Recreative Minds develops a philosophical theory of imagination that draws upon the latest work in psychology. This theory illuminates the use of imagination in coming to terms with art, its role in enabling us to live as social beings, and the psychological consequences of disordered imagination. The authors offer a lucid exploration of a fascinating subject
Dallmayr, Fred (2001). Memory and social imagination: Latin american reflections. Critical Horizons 2 (2):153-171.   (Google)
Abstract: The imagination opens onto a reconciliation of the past with the future, especially when it is activated as a retrieval of the memories of collective suffering. This is especially the case with the Latin American experience, with its history of military governments and their 'dirty wars' against their civilians. Using Ricoeur's notion of the metaphorical imagination, and drawing on Dussel's work on ethical hermeneutics, this paper argues that, in the act of remembering, other social imaginaries can be created as possibilities that go beyond the concrete present, and which occur from the vantage points of oppressed others
Degenhardt, M. A. B. (1975). Sartre, imagination and education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 9 (1):72–92.   (Google | More links)
De Mey, Tim (2006). Imagination's grip on science. Metaphilosophy 37 (2):222-239.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: In part because "imagination" is a slippery notion, its exact role in the production of scientific knowledge remains unclear. There is, however, one often explicit and deliberate use of imagination by scientists that can be (and has been) studied intensively by epistemologists and historians of science: thought experiments. The main goal of this article is to document the varieties of thought experimentation, not so much in terms of the different sciences in which they occur but rather in terms of the different functions they fulfil. I argue that thought experimentation (and hence imagination) plays a role not only in theory choice but in singular causal analysis and scientific discovery as well. I pinpoint, moreover, some of the rules governing the use of thought experiments in theory choice and in singular causal analysis, that is, some of the criteria they should meet in order to fulfil those functions successfully
Desmond, W. (1976). Collingwood, imagination and epistemology. Philosophical Studies 24:82-103.   (Google)
Dilworth, John B. (2008). Imaginative Versus Analytical Experiences of Wines. In Fritz Allhoff (ed.), Wine and Philosophy. Blackwell.   (Google)
Abstract: The highly enjoyable experiences associated with drinking good wines have been widely misunderstood. It is common to regard wine appreciation as an analytical or quasi-scientific kind of activity, in which wine experts carefully distinguish the precise sensory qualities of each wine, and then pass on their accumulated factual knowledge to less experienced wine enthusiasts. However, this model of wine appreciation is seriously defective. One good way to show its defects is to provide a better and more fundamental scientific account of what is involved in wine appreciation. In order to do so, I outline a novel, evolutionarily based theory of perceptual consciousness that explains why there must be imaginative as well as analytical kinds of experiences of wines. In addition, imaginative wine experiences, unlike typical imaginative artistic experiences, may be shown to involve highly individualistic, improvisatory elements that help to give wine drinking a unique place among the recreational arts
Doggett, Tyler & Egan, Andy (2007). Wanting things you don't want: The case for an imaginative analogue of desire. Philosophers' Imprint 7 (9):1-17.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: You’re imagining, in the course of a different game of make-believe, that you’re a bank robber. You don’t believe that you’re a bank robber. You are moved to point your finger, gun-wise, at the person pretending to be the bank teller and say, “Stick ‘em up! This is a robbery!”
Dorsch, Fabian, Imagination and depiction.   (Google)
Abstract: It has not been uncommon to maintain that our experiences of pictures are essentially, even if only partially, imaginative.1 This view seems, however, incompatible with what may be called the Agency Account of imaginings, according to which imaginings are mental actions of a certain kind. In this paper, I would like to contribute to the defence of this promising theory of imaginings by trying to undermine the idea that pictorial experience should be accounted for in terms of imagining
Egan, Andy (online). Imagination, delusion, and self-deception.   (Google)
Abstract: Subjects with delusions profess to believe some extremely peculiar things. Patients with Capgras delusion sincerely assert that, for example, their spouses have been replaced by impostors. Patients with Cotard’s delusion sincerely assert that they are dead. Many philosophers and psychologists are hesitant to say that delusional subjects genuinely believe the contents of their delusions.2 One way to reinterpret delusional subjects is to say that we’ve misidentified the content of the problematic belief. So for example, rather than believing that his wife is has been replaced by an impostor, we might say that the victim of Capgras delusion believes that it is, in some respects, as if his wife has been replaced by an impostor. Another is to say that we’ve misidentified the attitude that the delusional subject bears to the content of their delusion. So for example, Gregory Currie and co-authors have suggested that rather than believing that his wife has been replaced by an impostor, we should say that the victim of Capgras delusion merely imagines that his wife has been replaced by an impostor.3
Elliott, Brian (2005). Phenomenology and Imagination in Husserl and Heidegger. Routledge.   (Google)
Abstract: Phenomenology is one of the most pervasive and influential schools of thought in twentieth-century European philosophy. This book provides a systematic and comprehensive analysis of the idea of the imagination in Husserl and Heidegger. The author also locates phenomenology within the broader context of a philosophical world dominated by Kantian thought, arguing that the location of Husserl within the Kantian landscape is essential to an adequate understanding of phenomenology both as a historical event and as a legacy for present and future philosophy
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Gans, Eric Lawrence (2008). The Scenic Imagination: Originary Thinking From Hobbes to the Present Day. Stanford University Press.   (Google)
Abstract: The Scenic Imagination argues that the uniquely human phenomenon of representation, as manifested in language, art, and ritual, is a scenic event focused on a central object designated by a sign. The originary hypothesis posits the necessity of conceiving the origin of the human as such an event. In traditional societies, the scenic imagination through which this scene of origin is conceived manifests itself in sacred creation narratives. Modern thought is defined by the independent use of the scenic imagination to create anthropological models of the origin of human institutions, beginning with the social contract scene in Hobbes’s Leviathan that puts an end to the reciprocal violence of the state of nature. Eric Gans follows the work of the scenic imagination in selected writings of twenty thinkers including Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Durkheim, Boas, and Freud and concludes his book with a critical examination of contemporary writing on the origins of religion and language. In the process, he demonstrates that the originary hypothesis offers the most cohesive explanation of the origin and function of these fundamental institutions
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Gibbons, Sarah L. (1994). Kant's Theory of Imagination: Bridging Gaps in Judgement and Experience. Oxford University Press.   (Google)
Abstract: This book departs from much of the scholarship on Kant by demonstrating the centrality of imagination to Kant's philosophy as a whole. In Kant's works, human experience is simultaneously passive and active, thought and sensed, free and unfree: these dualisms are often thought of as unfortunate byproducts of his system. Gibbons, however, shows that imagination performs a vital function in "bridging gaps" between the different elements of cognition and experience. Thus, the role imagination plays in Kant's works expresses his fundamental insight into the complexity of cognition for finite rational beings such as ourselves
Goldie, Peter (2005). Imagination and the distorting power of emotion. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (8-10):127-139.   (Cited by 2 | Google | More links)
Abstract: _In real life, emotions can distort practical reasoning, typically in ways that it is_ _difficult to realise at the time, or to envisage and plan for in advance. This fea-_ _ture of real life emotional experience raises difficulties for imagining such expe-_ _riences through centrally imagining, or imagining ‘from the inside’. I argue_ _instead for the important psychological role played by another kind of imagin-_ _ing: imagining from an external perspective. This external perspective can draw_ _on the dramatic irony involved in imagining these typical cases, where one_ _knows outside the scope of the imagining what one does not know as part of the_ _content of what one imagines: namely, that the imagined emotion is distorting_ _one’s reasoning. Moreover, imagining from an external perspective allows one_ _to evaluate the imagined events in a way that imagining from the inside does not._
Goldie, Peter (2006). Wollheim on emotion and imagination. Philosophical Studies 127 (1):1-17.   (Cited by 1 | Google | More links)
Gornall, Thomas & S., J. (1963). A note on imagination and thought about God. Heythrop Journal 4 (2):135–140.   (Google | More links)
Grant, Edward (2004). Scientific imagination in the middle ages. Perspectives on Science 12 (4).   (Google)
Abstract: : Following Aristotle, medieval natural philosophers believed that knowledge was ultimately based on perception and observation; and like Aristotle, they also believed that observation could not explain the "why" of any perception. To arrive at the "why," natural philosophers offered theoretical explanations that required the use of the imagination. This was, however, only the starting point. Not only did they apply their imaginations to real phenomena, but expended even more intellectual energy on counterfactual phenomena, both extracosmic and intracosmic, extensively discussing, among other themes, the possible existence of other worlds and the possibility of an infinite extracosmic space. The application of the imagination to scientific problems during the Middle Ages was not an empty exercise, but, as I shall show, played a significant role in the development of early modern science
Grenberg, Jeanine (2007). Imagination in Kant's. Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (2).   (Google)
Guevara, Daniel (2009). Kant and the power of imagination (review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (4):pp. 629-630.   (Google)
Guggenbühl, Allan (2008). Education and imagination : A contradiction? Experiences from mythodramatic crisis intervention in schools. In Raya A. Jones (ed.), Education and Imagination: Post-Jungian Perspectives. Routledge.   (Google)
Hall, Steven (2008). Review of Stephen Mulhall, Wittgenstein's private language: Grammar, nonsense, and imagination in philosophical investigations §§243–315. Philosophical Investigations 31 (3):272–280.   (Google | More links)
Hanna, Robert (2003). Review of Martin Weatherston, Heidegger's Interpretation of Kant: Categories, Imagination, and Temporality. Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (8).   (Google)
Harding, F. J. W. (1964). Fantasy, imagination and Shakespeare. British Journal of Aesthetics 4 (4).   (Google)
Heal, Jane (2003). Mind, Reason, and Imagination: Selected Essays in Philosophy of Mind and Language. Cambridge University Press.   (Cited by 4 | Google | More links)
Abstract: Recent philosophy of mind has had a mistaken conception of the nature of psychological concepts. It has assumed too much similarity between psychological judgments and those of natural science and has thus overlooked the fact that other people are not just objects whose thoughts we may try to predict and control but fellow creatures with whom we talk and co-operate. In this collection of essays, Jane Heal argues that central to our ability to arrive at views about others' thoughts is not knowledge of some theory of the mind but rather an ability to imagine alternative worlds and how things appear from another person's point of view. She then applies this view to questions of how we represent others' thoughts, the shape of psychological concepts, the nature of rationality and the possibility of first person authority. This book should appeal to students and professionals in philosophy of mind and language
Hengehold, Laura (2002). “In that sleep of death what dreams...”: Foucault, existential phenomenology, and the Kantian imagination. Continental Philosophy Review 35 (2).   (Google)
Abstract: Although Foucault's early writings were strongly influenced by the discourse of existential phenomenology, he later considered it an obstacle to a better understanding of social and political power. This essay seeks to understand some of the reasons for his shift, specifically with respect to Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty. I argue that Foucault diverges from existential phenomenology according to an alternative tendency within the Kantian inheritance they both share: one which stresses the world-disruptive rather than the unifying or world-disclosive power of transcendental imagination. Examining the role played by dreams and death in Foucault's early introduction to Binswanger's Dream and Existence allows us to situate his later analysis of the historical and political (rather than existential) meaning of death with respect to larger philosophical currents
Hertzberg, Lars (1991). Imagination and the sense of identity. In Human Beings. New York: Cambridge University Press.   (Cited by 2 | Google)
Himmelfarb, Gertrude (2006). The Moral Imagination: From Edmund Burke to Lionel Trilling. Ivan R. Dee.   (Google)
Abstract: Edmund Burke : apologist for Judaism? -- George Eliot : the wisdom of Dorothea -- Jane Austen : the education of Emma -- Charles Dickens : "a low writer" -- Benjamin Disraeli : the Tory imagination -- John Stuart Mill : the other Mill -- Walter Bagehot : "a divided nature" -- John Buchan : an untimely appreciation -- The Knoxes : a God-haunted family -- Michael Oakeshott : the conservative disposition -- Winston Churchill : "quite simply, a great man" -- Lionel Trilling : the moral imagination.
Hoff, J. H. van't (1967). Imagination in Science. [New York]Springer-Verlag New York.   (Google)
Hohler, T. P. (1982). Imagination and Reflection: Intersubjectivity: Fichte's Grundlage of 1794. Distributors for the United States and Canada, Kluwer Boston.   (Google)
Holton, Gerald James (1978). The Scientific Imagination: With a New Introduction. Harvard University Press.   (Google)
Holton, Gerald James (1978). The Scientific Imagination: Case Studies. Cambridge University Press.   (Google)
Hume, Robert D. (1970). Kant and coleridge on imagination. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 28 (4):485-496.   (Google | More links)
Ichikawa, Jonathan (2009). Dreaming and imagination. Mind and Language 24 (1):103-121.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: Penultimate draft; please refer to published version. I argue, on philosophical, psychological, and neurophysiological grounds, that contrary to an orthodox view, dreams do not typically involve misleading sensations and false beliefs. I am thus in partial agreement with Colin McGinn, who has argued that we do not have misleading sensory experience while dreaming, and partially in agreement with Ernest Sosa, who has argued that we do not form false beliefs while dreaming. Rather, on my view, dreams involve mental imagery and propositional imagination. I defend the imagination model of dreaming from some objections
Ichikawa, Jonathan (online). Inference in imagination and counterfactual conditionals.   (Google)
Abstract: I propose an explanation for reasoning about counterfactual conditionals. We reason properly to a counterfactual if A, C, when we imagine A along with cotenable background conditions, then properly infer C. Proper inference in my sense is just the same sort of inference that is proper in cases of theoretical reasoning with beliefs. (Roughly: a proper inference is warrant-transferring from belief in A and the background conditions to C.) Cotenability for counterfactuals is explained by reference to our abilities to attribute beliefs to others, given sincere testimony. (Roughly: p is cotenable with A just in case it would be reasonable to attribute the belief that p to a person who sincerely asserted A, in the conversational context.) I close with a proposal for the semantics of counterfactual conditionals. To assert the counterfactual is merely to claim that (the conditions are such that) there is an available inference from the antecedent, with the cotenable conditions, to the consequent
Ichikawa, Jonathan (2008). Skepticism and the imagination model of dreaming. The Philosophical Quarterly 58 (232):519–527.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: Penultimate draft; please refer to published version -- especially important in this case, as the official version has been Britishized; even the title's second letter is not the same. Abstract. Ernest Sosa has argued that the solution to dream skepticism lies in an understanding of dreams as imaginative experiences – when we dream, on this suggestion, we do not believe the contents of our dreams, but rather imagine them. Sosa rebuts skepticism thus: dreams don’t cause false beliefs, so my beliefs cannot be false, having been caused by dreams. I argue that, even assuming that Sosa is correct about the nature of dreaming, belief in wakefulness on these grounds is epistemically irresponsible. The proper upshot of the imagination model, I suggest, is to recharacterize the way we think about dream skepticism: the skeptical threat is not, after all, that we have false beliefs. So even though dreams don’t involve false beliefs, they still pose a skeptical threat, which I elaborate
Jansen, Julia (2006). Review of Brian Elliott, Phenomenology and Imagination in Husserl and Heidegger. Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (8).   (Google)
Johnson, Mark L. (1987). The Body in the Mind: The Bodily Basis of Meaning, Imagination, and Reason. University of Chicago Press.   (Cited by 2049 | Google)
Jones, Raya A. (ed.) (2008). Education and Imagination: Post-Jungian Perspectives. Routledge.   (Google)
Jones, Mostyn W. (1995). Inadequacies in current theories of imagination. Southern Journal of Philosophy 33 (3):313-333.   (Google)
Abstract: Interest in imagination dates back to Plato and Aristotle, but full-length works have been devoted to it only relatively recently by Sartre, McKellar, Furlong, Casey, Johnson, Warnock, Brann, and others. Despite their length and variety, however, these current theories take overly narrow views of this complex phenomenon. (1) Their definitions of “imagination” neglect the multiplicity of its meanings and tend to focus narrowly on the power of imaging alone (which produces images and imagery). But imagination in the fullest, most encompassing sense centers instead on creativity, which involves both imaging and reasoning powers. (2) Current accounts of the operations of imagination narrowly construe it in fixed, immutable terms. But it’s instead a dynamic, evolving synergy of its psychological roots (images and symbols) and sociobiological roots (cultures and instincts). This synergy has transformed the roles of images and symbols in imagination (as Vygotsky, Goody, etc. note). For example, in the shift from mytheopic to scientific imagination, literacy and formal education fostered abstract symbolic thinking (reason), which differs from mytheopic thinking based on richly concrete associations (imagery). The result was “more than cool reason”, but experimental studies (by Perkins, Clement, etc.) show that it’s also more than just dreamy imagery. It’s a dynamic synergy of the two that has transformed both. (3) Current evaluations of imagination’s potentials are also narrow. They tend to focus on its role in mental life while ignoring social and political life. Also, they tend to follow romantic and existentialist customs of extolling imagination’s virtues without soberly critiquing its limitations. Again, they ignore the synergy of psychological, sociological and biological forces that shape mental and social evolution, and promote and constrain imagination in complex ways. For example, Sartre surreally asks us to choose our own nature with an imagination emancipated from institutional and instinctual strictures. Yet making intelligible choices depends on these strictures. (4) In conclusion, current theories define imagination narrowly in terms of imaging, they describe its operations in fixed and immutable terms, and they evaluate its potentials without examining the full interplay of forces shaping it. These shortcomings are remedied by a broader perspective that defines imagination more adequately and comprehensively, and that recognizes it’s complex roots, dynamic operations, and evolving potentials.
Joyce, P. (2003). Imagining experiences correctly. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (3):361-370.   (Google | More links)
Kallen, H. M. (1916). Philosophic formalism and scientific imagination. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 13 (22):597-607.   (Google | More links)
Kaplan, Edward K. (1972). Gaston Bachelard's philosophy of imagination: An introduction. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 33 (1):1-24.   (Google | More links)
Kaufmann, Fritz & Heider, Fritz (1947). On imagination. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 7 (3):369-375.   (Google | More links)
Ker, W. P. (1901). Imagination and judgment. International Journal of Ethics 11 (4):469-481.   (Google | More links)
Lyons, John D. (1999). Descartes and modern imagination. Philosophy and Literature 23 (2).   (Google)
Maguire, Matthew William (2006). The Conversion of Imagination: From Pascal Through Rousseau to Tocqueville. Harvard University Press.   (Google)
Morgan, Mary S. (2004). Imagination and imaging in model building. Philosophy of Science 71 (5):753-766.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: Modelling became one of the primary tools of mathematical economic research in the twentieth century, but when we look at examples of how nonanalogical models were first built in economics, both the process of making representations and aspects of the representing relation remain opaque. Like early astronomers, economists have to imagine how the hidden parts of their world are arranged and to make images, that is, create models, to represent how they work. The case of the Edgeworth Box, a model widely used for theoretical work in twentieth-century economics, provides a good example to explore the process of making mathematical representations of the economy. It shows how, in making these new representations, conceptual elements were developed which could not have been represented in the older verbal forms of economics
Morley, James (2005). Introduction: Phenomenology of imagination. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (2).   (Cited by 8 | Google)
Mulhall, Stephen (2007). Wittgenstein's Private Language: Grammar, Nonsense, and Imagination in Philosophical Investigations, Sections 243-315. Oxford University Press.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: Stephen Mulhall offers a new way of interpreting one of the most famous and contested texts in modern philosophy: remarks on "private language" in Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations. He sheds new light on a central controversy concerning Wittgenstein's early work by showing its relevance to a proper understanding of the later work
Reynolds, Steven L. (1989). Imagining oneself to be another. Noûs 23 (5):615-633.   (Google | More links)
Sellars, Wilfrid, The role of imagination in Kant's theory of experience.   (Google)
Sepper, Dennis L. (1989). Descartes and the eclipse of imagination, 1618-1630. Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (3).   (Google)
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Weinberg, Jonathan M. & Meskin, Aaron (2006). Puzzling over the imagination: Philosophical problems, architectural solutions. In Shaun Nichols (ed.), The Architecture of the Imagination: New Essays on Pretence, Possibility, and Fiction. Oxford.   (Google | More links)
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Wood, David W. (2009). Kant and the power of imagination by Jane Kneller. European Journal of Philosophy 17 (3):464-468.   (Google)