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5.1l.6.22. Jealousy (Jealousy on PhilPapers)

Murphy, Jeffrie G. (2002). Jealousy, shame, and the rival. Philosophical Studies 108 (1-2).   (Google)
Abstract:   This essay is a critique of the two chapters on jealousy in Jerome Neu's book A Tear is an Intellectual Thing. The rival — as anobject of both fear and hatred — is of central importance in romantic jealousy, but it is here argued that the role of the rival cannot be fully understood in Neu's account of jealousy and that shame (not noted by Neu) must be seen as central to the concept of jealousy if the role of the rival is to be fully understood
Purshouse, Luke (2004). Jealousy in relation to envy. Erkenntnis 60 (2).   (Google)
Abstract:   The conceptions of jealousy used by philosophical writers are various, and, this paper suggests, largely inadequate. In particular, the difference between jealousy and envy has not yet been plausibly specified. This paper surveys some past analyses of this distinction and addresses problems with them, before proposing its own positive account of jealousy, developed from an idea of Leila Tov-Ruach(a.k.a. A. O. Rorty). Three conditions for being jealous are proposed and it is shownhow each of them helps to tell the emotion apart from some distinct species of envy.It is acknowledged that the referents of the two terms are, to some extent, overlapping,but shown how this overlap is justified by the psychologies of the respective emotions
Wreen, Michael J. (1989). Jealousy. Noûs 23 (5):635-652.   (Google | More links)