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8.10e. The Minimally Conscious State (The Minimally Conscious State on PhilPapers)

See also:
Ashwal, Stephen (2003). Medical aspects of the minimally conscious state in children. Brain and Development 25 (8):535-545.   (Cited by 3 | Google | More links)
Bernat, James L. (2006). Chronic disorders of consciousness. Lancet 367 (9517):1181-1192.   (Cited by 4 | Google | More links)
Bernat, James L. (2002). Questions remaining about the minimally conscious state. Neurology 58 (3):337-338.   (Cited by 20 | Google | More links)
Bernat, James L. (2002). The biophilosophical basis of whole-brain death. Soc Philos Policy 19 (2):324-42.   (Cited by 5 | Google | More links)
Boly, Melanie; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth E. & Peigneux, Philippe (2004). Auditory processing in severely brain injured patients: Differences between the minimally conscious state and the persistent vegetative state. Archives of Neurology 61 (2):233-238.   (Google)
Coleman, Diane; Shewmon, D. Alan & Giacino, J. T. (2002). "The minimally conscious state: Definition and diagnostic criteria": Comments and reply. Neurology 58 (3):506-507.   (Google)
Fins, Joseph J.; Schiff, Nicholas D. & Foley, Kathleen M. (2007). Late recovery from the minimally conscious state: Ethical and policy implications. Neurology 68 (4):304-307.   (Cited by 2 | Google | More links)
Fins, Joseph J. (2005). Rethinking disorders of consciousness: New research and its implications. Hastings Center Report 35 (2):22-24.   (Cited by 7 | Google | More links)
Giacino, Joseph T. & Kalmar, Kathleen (2005). Diagnostic and prognostic guidelines for the vegetative and minimally conscious states. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. Vol 15 (3-4):166-174.   (Google)
Giacino, Joseph T. & Trott, Charlotte T. (2004). Rehabilitative management of patients with disorders of consciousness: Grand Rounds. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation 19 (3):254-265.   (Cited by 5 | Google | More links)
Giacino, Joseph T. & Ashwal S., Childs N. (2002). The minimally conscious state: Definition and diagnostic criteria. Neurology 58 (3):349-353.   (Cited by 163 | Google | More links)
Giacino, Joseph T. (2006). The minimally conscious state: Defining the borders of consciousness. In Steven Laureys (ed.), Boundaries of Consciousness. Elsevier.   (Cited by 8 | Google)
Giacino, Joseph T. & Whyte, J. T. (2005). The vegetative and minimally conscious states: Current knowledge and remaining questions. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilation 20 (1):30-50.   (Cited by 15 | Google | More links)
Giacino, Joseph T. & Kalmar, Kathleen (1997). The vegetative and minimally conscious states: A comparison of clinical features and functional outcome. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilation 12:36-51.   (Cited by 45 | Google)
Gill-Thwaites, H. & Munday, R. (2004). The sensory modality assessment and rehabilitation technique (SMaRT): A valid and reliable assessment for vegetative state and minimally conscious state patients. Brain Injury 18 (12):1255-1269.   (Google)
Glannon, Walter (2008). Neurostimulation and the minimally conscious state. Bioethics 22 (6):337–345.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: Neurostimulation to restore cognitive and physical functions is an innovative and promising technique for treating patients with severe brain injury that has resulted in a minimally conscious state (MCS). The technique may involve electrical stimulation of the central thalamus, which has extensive projections to the cerebral cortex. Yet it is unclear whether an improvement in neurological functions would result in a net benefit for these patients. Quality-of-life measurements would be necessary to determine whether any benefit of neurostimulation outweighed any harm in their response to different degrees of cognitive and physical disability. These measures could also indicate whether the technique could be ethically justified and whether surrogates could give proxy consent to its use on brain-injured patients
Guérit, Jean-Michel (2005). Neurophysiological patterns of vegetative and minimally conscious states. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. Vol 15 (3-4):357-371.   (Google)
Katz, Douglas (online). Minimally conscious states.   (Google)
Knight, Robert T. (2008). Consciousness unchained: Ethical issues and the vegetative and minimally conscious state. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):1 – 2.   (Google)
Laureys, Steven; Perrin, Fabien & Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth E. (2004). Cerebral processing in the minimally conscious state. Neurology 63 (5):916-918.   (Cited by 26 | Google | More links)
Laureys, Steven; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth E. & Ferring, M. (2003). Differences in brain metabolism between patients in coma, vegetative state, minimally conscious state and locked-in syndrome. European Journal of Neurology 10.   (Cited by 4 | Google)
Naccache, Lionel (2006). Is she conscious? Science 313 (5792).   (Cited by 1 | Google)
Perrin, Fabien; Schnakers, Caroline; Schabus, Manuel; Degueldre, Christian; Goldman, Serge; Brédart, Serge; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth E.; Lamy, Maurice; Moonen, Gustave; Luxen, André; Maquet, Pierre & Laureys, Steven (2006). Brain response to one's own name in vegetative state, minimally conscious state, and locked-in syndrome. Archives of Neurology 63 (4):562-569.   (Cited by 3 | Google | More links)
Schiff, Nicholas D.; Rodriguez-Moreno, D. & Kamal, A. (2005). FMRI reveals large-scale network activation in minimally conscious patients. Neurology 64:514-523.   (Cited by 52 | Google | More links)
Schiff, Nicholas D. (2006). Modeling the minimally conscious state: Measurements of brain function and therapeutic possibilities. In Steven Laureys (ed.), Boundaries of Consciousness. Elsevier.   (Cited by 12 | Google | More links)
Talbot, L. R. & Whitaker, H. A. (1994). Brain-injured persons in an altered state of consciousness: Measures and intervention strategies. Brain Injury 8:689-99.   (Cited by 9 | Google | More links)
Varelius, Jukka (2009). Minimally conscious state and human dignity. Neuroethics 2 (1).   (Google)
Abstract: Recent progress in neurosciences has improved our understanding of chronic disorders of consciousness. One example of this advancement is the emergence of the new diagnostic category of minimally conscious state (MCS). The central characteristic of MCS is impaired consciousness. Though the phenomenon now referred to as MCS pre-existed its inclusion in diagnostic classifications, the current medical ethical concepts mainly apply to patients with normal consciousness and to non-conscious patients. Accordingly, how we morally should stand with persons in minimally conscious state remains unclear. In this paper, I examine whether the notion of human dignity could provide us with guidance with the moral difficulties MCS gives rise to. More precisely, I focus on the question of whether we are justified in holding that persons in minimally conscious state possess human dignity
Varelius, Jukka (forthcoming). Respect for autonomy, advance directives, and minimally conscious state. Bioethics.   (Google)
Abstract: In this article, I consider whether the advance directive of a person in minimally conscious state ought to be adhered to when its prescriptions conflict with her current wishes. I argue that an advance directive can have moral significance after its issuer has succumbed to minimally conscious state. I also defend the view that the patient can still have a significant degree of autonomy. Consequently, I conclude that her advance directive ought not to be applied. Then I briefly assess whether considerations pertaining to respecting the patient's autonomy could still require obedience to the desire expressed in her advance directive and arrive at a negative answer
White, Mary Terrell (2006). Diagnosing PVS and minimally conscious state: The role of tacit knowledge and intuition. Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (1):62-71.   (Google)