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8.2a. Consciousness, Sleep, and Dreaming (Consciousness, Sleep, and Dreaming on PhilPapers)

See also:
Antrobus, John S. (2000). How does the dreaming brain explain the dreaming mind? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):904-907.   (Google)
Abstract: Recent work on functional brain architecture during dreaming provides invaluable clues for an understanding of dreaming, but identifying active brain regions during dreaming, together with their waking cognitive and cognitive functions, informs a model that accounts for only the grossest characteristics of dreaming. Improved dreaming models require cross discipline apprehension of what it is we want dreaming models to “explain.” [Hobson et al.; Neilsen; Revonsuo; Solms]
Arden, J. B. (1996). Consciousness, Dreams, and Self: A Transdisciplinary Approach. Psychosocial Press.   (Cited by 3 | Google)
Baruss, Imants (2003). Dreams. In Imants Baruss (ed.), Alterations of Consciousness: An Empirical Analysis for Social Scientists. American Psychological Association.   (Google)
Baruss, Imants (2003). Sleep. In Imants Baruss (ed.), Alterations of Consciousness: An Empirical Analysis for Social Scientists. American Psychological Association.   (Google)
Bassetti, Claudio (2001). Disturbances of consciousness and sleep-wake functions. In Julien Bogousslavsky & Louis R. Caplan (eds.), Stroke Syndromes. Cambridge University Press.   (Google)
Bentley, E. (2000). Awareness: Biorhythms, Sleep and Dreaming. Routledge.   (Cited by 5 | Google | More links)
Blackmore, Susan J. (1991). Lucid dreaming: Awake in your sleep? Skeptical Inquirer 15:362-370.   (Google)
Abstract: What could it mean to be conscious in your dreams? For most of us, dreaming is something quite separate from normal life. When we wake up from being chased by a ferocious tiger, or seduced by a devastatingly good-looking Nobel Prize winner we realize with relief or disappointment that "it was only a dream."
Bosinelli, M. (1995). Mind and consciousness during sleep. Behavioural Brain Research 69:195-201.   (Cited by 27 | Google)
Brereton, Derek P. (2000). Dreaming, adaptation, and consciousness: The social mapping hypothesis. Ethos 28 (3):377-409.   (Cited by 3 | Google)
Brewer, Bill (2001). Precis of perception and reason, and response to commentator (michael ayers). Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.   (Google)
Abstract: What is the role of conscious perceptual experience in the acquisition of empirical knowledge? My central claim is that a proper account of the way in which perceptual experiences contribute to our understanding of the most basic beliefs about particular things in the mind-independent world around us reveals how such experiences provide peculiarly fundamental reasons for such beliefs. There are, I claim, epistemic requirements upon the very possibility of empirical belief. The crucial epistemological role of experiences lies in their essential contribution to the subject’s understanding of certain perceptual demonstrative contents, simply grasping which provides him with a reason to endorse them in belief. Part I of my book argues that this must be so; Part II explains in detail how it is so
Broughton, R. J. (1982). Human consciousness and sleep/waking rhythms: A review and some neuropsychological considerations. Journal of Clinical Neuropsychology 4:193-218.   (Cited by 29 | Google)
Cicogna, P. & Bosinelli, M. (2001). Consciousness during dreams. Consciousness and Cognition 10 (1):26-41.   (Cited by 7 | Google | More links)
Abstract: Two aspects of consciousness are first considered: consciousness as awareness (phenomenological meaning) and consciousness as strategic control (functional meaning). As to awareness, three types can be distinguished: first, awareness as the phenomenal experiences of objects and events; second, awareness as meta-awareness, i.e., the awareness of mental life itself; third, awareness as self-awareness, i.e., the awareness of being oneself. While phenomenal experience and self-awareness are usually present during dreaming (even if many modifications are possible), meta-awareness is usually absent (apart from some particular experiences of self-reflectiveness) with the major exception of lucid dreaming. Consciousness as strategic control may also be present in dreams. The functioning of consciousness is then analyzed, following a cognitive model of dream production. In such a model, the dream is supposed to be the product of the interaction of three components: (a) the bottom-up activation of mnemonic elements coming from LTM systems, (b) interpretative and elaborative top-down processes, and (c) monitoring of phenomenal experience. A feedback circulation is activated among the components, where the top-down interpretative organization and the conscious monitoring of the oneiric scene elicitates other mnemonic contents, according to the requirements of the dream plot. This dream productive activity is submitted to unconscious and conscious processes
Combs, Allan & Krippner, Stanley (1998). Dream sleep and waking reality: A dynamical view. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press.   (Google)
Drewitt, J. A. J. (1911). On the distinction between waking and dreaming. Mind 20 (77):67-73.   (Google | More links)
Flanagan, Owen J. (1997). Prospects for a unified theory of consciousness or, what dreams are made of. In Jonathan D. Cohen & Jonathan W. Schooler (eds.), Scientific Approaches to Consciousness. Lawrence Erlbaum.   (Cited by 9 | Google)
Foulkes, D. (1990). Dreaming and consciousness. European Journal of Cognitive Psychology 2:39-55.   (Cited by 15 | Google)
Gackenbach, J. & LaBerge, S. (1988). Conscious Mind, Sleeping Brain: Perspectives on Lucid Dreaming. Plenum Press.   (Cited by 15 | Google)
Green, Christopher D. & McGreery, C. (1994). Lucid Dreaming: The Paradox of Consciousness During Sleep. Routledge.   (Cited by 7 | Google)
Abstract: Throughout, there are many case histories to illustrate the text.
Hearne, K. M. (1992). Prolucid dreaming, lucid dreams, and consciousness. Journal of Mental Imagery 16:119-123.   (Google)
Hobson, Allan (2004). A model for madness? Dream consciousness: Our understanding of the neurobiology of sleep offers insight into abnormalities in the waking brain. Nature 430 (6995):21.   (Google)
Hobson, J. Allan; Pace-Schott, Edward F. & Stickgold, Robert (2000). Consciousness: Its vicissitudes in waking and sleep. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The New Cognitive Neurosciences: 2nd Edition. MIT Press.   (Cited by 33 | Google)
Hobson, J. Allan; Pace-Schott, Edward F. & Stickgold, Robert (2000). Dreaming and the brain: Toward a cognitive neuroscience of conscious states. Behavioral And Brain Sciences 23 (6):793-842; 904-1018; 1083-1121.   (Cited by 214 | Google | More links)
Abstract: Sleep researchers in different disciplines disagree about how fully dreaming can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Debate has focused on whether REM sleep dreaming is qualitatively different from nonREM (NREM) sleep and waking. A review of psychophysiological studies shows clear quantitative differences between REM and NREM mentation and between REM and waking mentation. Recent neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies also differentiate REM, NREM, and waking in features with phenomenological implications. Both evidence and theory suggest that there are isomorphisms between the phenomenology and the physiology of dreams. We present a three-dimensional model with specific examples from normally and abnormally changing conscious states. Key Words: consciousness; dreaming; neuroimaging; neuromodulation; NREM; phenomenology; qualia; REM; sleep
Hobson, J. Allan; Pace-Schott, Edward F. & Stickgold, Robert (2003). Dreaming and the brain: Toward a cognitive neuroscience of conscious states. In Edward F. Pace-Schott, Mark Solms, Mark Blagrove & Stevan Harnad (eds.), Sleep and Dreaming: Scientific Advances and Reconsiderations. Cambridge University Press.   (Cited by 216 | Google | More links)
Abstract: Sleep researchers in different disciplines disagree about how fully dreaming can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Debate has focused on whether REM sleep dreaming is qualitatively different from nonREM (NREM) sleep and waking. A review of psychophysiological studies shows clear quantitative differences between REM and NREM mentation and between REM and waking mentation. Recent neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies also differentiate REM, NREM, and waking in features with phenomenological implications. Both evidence and theory suggest that there are isomorphisms between the phenomenology and the physiology of dreams. We present a three-dimensional model with specific examples from normally and abnormally changing conscious states. Key Words: consciousness; dreaming; neuroimaging; neuromodulation; NREM; phenomenology; qualia; REM; sleep
Hobson, J. Allan & Pace-Schott, Edward F. (2002). The cognitive neuroscience of sleep: Neuronal systems, consciousness and learning. Nature Reviews Neuroscience 3:679-93.   (Cited by 171 | Google | More links)
Stickgold, R. & Hobson, J. Allan (1995). The conscious state paradigm: A neurocognitive approach to waking, sleeping, and dreaming. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences. MIT Press.   (Cited by 13 | Google)
Hobson, J. Allan (1998). The conscious state paradigm: A neuropsychological analysis of waking, sleeping, and dreaming. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press.   (Google)
Hobson, J. Allan (2003). The Dream Drugstore: Chemically Altered States of Consciousness. MIT Press.   (Cited by 20 | Google | More links)
Abstract: In this book J. Allan Hobson offers a new understanding of altered states of consciousness based on knowledge of how our brain chemistry is balanced when we are...
Johnstone Jr, Henry W. (1973). Toward a philosophy of sleep. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 34 (September):73-81.   (Google)
Jones, B. E. (1998). The neural basis of consciousness across the sleep-waking cycle. In H. Jasper, L. Descarries, V. Castellucci & S. Rossignol (eds.), Consciousness: At the Frontiers of Neuroscience. Lippincott-Raven.   (Cited by 25 | Google)
Kahan, Tracey L. & LaBerge, S. (1996). Cognition and metacognition in dreaming and waking: Comparisons of first and third-person ratings. Dreaming 6:235-249.   (Cited by 5 | Google)
Kahan, Tracey L. (2001). Consciousness in dreaming: A metacognitive approach. In Kelly Bulkeley (ed.), Dreams: A Reader on Religious, Cultural, and Psychological Dimensions of Dreaming. Palgrave.   (Google)
Kahn, David; Pace-Schott, Edward F. & Hobson, J. Allan (1997). Consciousness in waking and dreaming: The roles of neuronal oscillation and neuromodulation in determining similarities and differences. Neuroscience 78:13-38.   (Google)
Kahan, Tracey L. & LaBerge, S. (1994). Lucid dreaming as metacognition: Implications for cognitive science. Consciousness and Cognition 3:246-64.   (Cited by 13 | Google)
Kahn, David & Hobson, J. Allan (2003). State dependence of character perception: Implausibility differences in dreaming and waking consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (3):57-68.   (Google)
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King, C. Daly (1947). Dream and the problem of consciousness. Journal of General Psychology 37:15-24.   (Google)
Kleitman, N. (1957). Sleep, wakefulness, and consciousness. Psychological Bulletin 54:354-359.   (Cited by 2 | Google)
Kozmová, Miloslava & Wolman, Richard N. (2006). Self-awareness in dreaming. Dreaming 16 (3):196-214.   (Google)
Krippner, Stanley & Combs, Allan (2000). Self-organization in the dreaming brain. Journal of Mind and Behavior 21 (4):399-412.   (Cited by 3 | Google)
LaBerge, S. (1998). Dreaming and consciousness. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press.   (Cited by 5 | Google)
LaBerge, S. (1985). Lucid Dreaming. J.   (Cited by 98 | Google | More links)
LaBerge, S.; Levitan, L. & Dement, W. C. (1986). Lucid dreaming: Physiological correlates of consciousness during Rem sleep. Journal of Mind and Behavior 7:251-258.   (Cited by 12 | Google)
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LaBerge, S. & DeGracia, D. (2000). Varieties of lucid dreaming experience. In Robert G. Kunzendorf & B. Alan Wallace (eds.), Individual Differences in Conscious Experience. John Benjamins.   (Cited by 2 | Google)
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Mahowald, Mark W. (2004). Commentary on Sleep and Dream Suppression Following a Lateral Medullary Infarct: A First Person Account by J. Allan Hobson. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):134-137.   (Google | More links)
Makeig, S.; Jung, T. & Sejnowski, Terrence J. (2000). Awareness during drowsiness: Dynamics and electrophysiological correlates. Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology 54 (4):266-273.   (Cited by 8 | Google | More links)
Maquet, Pierre; Ruby, P.; Maudoux, A.; Albouy, G.; Sterpenich, V.; Dan-Vu, T.; Desseilles, M.; Boly, Melanie; Perrin, Fabien; Peigneux, Philippe & Laureys, Steven (2006). Human cognition during Rem sleep and the activity profile within frontal and parietal cortices. A reappraisal of functional neuroimaging data. In Steven Laureys (ed.), Boundaries of Consciousness. Elsevier.   (Google)
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Revonsuo, Antti (1995). Consciousness, dreams and virtual realities. Philosophical Psychology 8 (1):35-58.   (Cited by 87 | Google)
Abstract: In this paper I develop the thesis that dreams are essential to an understanding of waking consciousness. In the first part I argue in opposition to the philosophers Malcolm and Dennett that empirical evidence now shows dreams to be real conscious experiences. In the second part, three questions concerning consciousness research are addressed. (1) How do we isolate the system to be explained (consciousness) from other systems? (2) How do we describe the system thus isolated? (3) How do we reveal the mechanisms on which this system is based? I suggest that empirical dream research combined with other empirical approaches can help us to sketch answers to all of these questions. I argue that the subjective form of dreams reveals the subjective, macro-level form of consciousness in general and that both dreams and the everyday phenomenal world may be thought of as constructed “virtual realities”. A major task for empirical consciousness research is to find out the mechanisms which bind this experienced world into a coherent whole
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Solms, Mark (2002). Dreaming: Cholinergic and dopaminergic hypotheses. In Elaine Perry, Heather Ashton & Allan Young (eds.), Neurochemistry of Consciousness: Neurotransmitters in Mind. Advances in Consciousness Research. John Benjamins.   (Google)
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