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8.8j. The Stream of Consciousness (The Stream of Consciousness on PhilPapers)

See also:
Antrobus, J. S.; Singer, Jerome L. & Greenberg, Sean (1966). Studies in the stream of consciousness: Experimental enhancement and suppression of spontaneous cognitive processes. Perceptual and Motor Skills 23:399-417.   (Cited by 3 | Google)
Baars, Bernard J. (1993). How does a serial, integrated and very limited stream of consciousness emerge from a nervous system that is mostly unconscious, distributed, parallel and of enormous capacity? In Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Consciousness. Ciba Foundation Symposium 174.   (Google)
Bailey, Andrew R. (1999). Beyond the fringe: William James on the transitive parts of the stream of consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (2-3):141-53.   (Cited by 7 | Google)
Bakan, P. (1978). Two streams of consciousness: A typological approach. In K. S. Pope & Jerome L. Singer (eds.), The Stream of Consciousness: Scientific Investigation Into the Flow of Experience. Plenum.   (Cited by 1 | Google)
Bernstein, Marica; Stiehl, Samantha & Bickle, John (2000). The effect of motivation on the stream of consciousness: Generalizing from a neurocomputational model of cingulo-frontal circuits controlling saccadic eye movements. In Ralph D. Ellis & Natika Newton (eds.), The Caldron of Consciousness: Motivation, Affect and Self-Organization. John Benjamins.   (Google)
Bittner, T. J. (2004). Could the stream of consciousness flow through the brain. Philosophia 31 (3-4):449-473.   (Google | More links)
Blackmore, Susan J. (2002). There is no stream of consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (5):17-28.   (Cited by 6 | Google | More links)
Abstract: Throughout history there have been people who say it is all illusion. I think they may be right. But if they are right what could this mean? If you just say "It's all an illusion" this gets you nowhere - except that a whole lot of other questions appear. Why should we all be victims of an illusion, instead of seeing things the way they really are? What sort of illusion is it anyway? Why is it like that and not some other way? Is it possible to see through the illusion? And if so what happens next
Bonanno, Giacomo A. & Singer, Jerome L. (1993). Controlling one's stream of thought through perceptual and reflective processing. In Daniel M. Wegner & J. Pennebaker (eds.), Handbook of Mental Control. Prentice-Hall.   (Google)
Bradley McGilvary, Evander (1907). The stream of consciousness. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 4 (9):225-235.   (Google | More links)
Bush, Wendell T. (1907). The continuity of consciousness. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 4 (16):428-432.   (Google | More links)
Capek, Milic (1950). Stream of consciousness and "duree reelle". Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 10 (March):331-353.   (Cited by 1 | Google | More links)
Chafe, Wallace L. (2000). A linguist's perspective on William James and "the stream of thought.". Consciousness and Cognition 9 (4):618-628.   (Cited by 1 | Google | More links)
Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly (1990). Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience. Harper & Row.   (Cited by 3410 | Google)
Dainton, Barry, Précis: Stream of consciousness.   (Google)
Abstract: That our ordinary everyday experience exhibits both unity and continuity is uncontroversial, and on the face of it utterly unmysterious. At any moment we have some conscious awareness of both the world about us, as revealed through our perceptual experiences, and our own inner states – our bodily sensations, thoughts, mental images and so on. Since once wakened we tend to stay awake for several hours, tracing out continuous routes through whatever environment we happen to find ourselves in, it is hardly surprising that our experience itself is continuous rather than discontinuous
Dainton, Barry F. (2000). Stream of Consciousness: Unity and Continuity in Conscious Experience. Routledge.   (Cited by 33 | Google | More links)
Abstract: Stream of Consciousness is about the phenomenology of conscious experience. Barry Dainton shows us that stream of consciousness is not a mosaic of discrete fragments of experience, but rather an interconnected flowing whole. Through a deep probing into the nature of awareness, introspection, phenomenal space and time consciousness, Dainton offers a truly original understanding of the nature of consciousness
Dennett, Daniel C. (1998). No bridge over the stream of consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):753-754.   (Google)
Abstract: Pessoa et al.'s target article shows that although filling-in of various kinds does appear to occur in the brain, it is not required in order to furnish a “bridge locus” where neural events are “isomorphic” to the features of visual consciousness. Some recently uncovered completion phenomena may well play a crucial role in the elaboration of normal visual experience, but others occur too slowly to contribute to normal visual content
Diaz, J. (1996). The stream revisited: A process model of phenomenological consciousness. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness. MIT Press.   (Cited by 2 | Google)
Dietrich, A. (2004). Neurocognitive mechanisms underlying the experience of flow. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (4):746-61.   (Cited by 5 | Google)
Dryden, Donald (2001). Susanne Langer and William James: Art and the dynamics of the stream of consciousness. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 15 (4).   (Google)
Epstein, Russell (2000). Substantive thoughts about substantive thought: A reply to Galin. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (4):584-590.   (Google | More links)
Abstract: In his commentary, David Galin raises several important issues that deserve to be addressed. In this response, I do three things. First, I briefly discuss the relation between the present work and the metaphoric theories of thought developed by cognitive lin- guists such as Lakoff and Johnson (1998). Second, I address some of the confusions that seem to have arisen about my use of the terms ''substantive thought'' and ''nucleus.'' Third, I briefly discuss some of the directions that Galin suggests for further research
Epstein, Russell (2000). The neural-cognitive basis of the Jamesian stream of thought. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (4):550-575.   (Cited by 42 | Google | More links)
Abstract: William James described the stream of thought as having two components: (1) a nucleus of highly conscious, often perceptual material; and (2) a fringe of dimly felt contextual information that controls the entry of information into the nucleus and guides the progression of internally directed thought. Here I examine the neural and cognitive correlates of this phenomenology. A survey of the cognitive neuroscience literature suggests that the nucleus corresponds to a dynamic global buffer formed by interactions between different regions of the brain, while the fringe corresponds to a set of mechanisms in the frontal and medial temporal lobes that control the contents of this global buffer. A consequence of this account is that there might be conscious imagistic representations that are not part of the nucleus. I argue that phenomenology can be linked to psychology and neuroscience and a meaningful way that illuminates both
Flavell, John H.; Green, F. L. & Flavell, E. R. (1993). Children's understanding of the stream of consciousness. Child Development 64:387-398.   (Cited by 48 | Google | More links)
Flanagan, Owen J. (1992). The stream of consciousness. In Consciousness Reconsidered. MIT Press.   (Google)
Galin, David (2004). Aesthetic experience: Marcel Proust and the neo-Jamesian structure of awareness. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (2):241-253.   (Google)
Galin, David (2000). Comments on Epstein's neurocognitive interpretation of William James's model of consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (4):576-583.   (Cited by 8 | Google | More links)
Galin, David (1994). The structure of awareness: Contemporary applications of William James' forgotten concept of "the fringe". Journal of Mind and Behavior 15 (4):375-401.   (Cited by 2 | Google)
Gurwitsch, Aron (1943). William James' theory of the "transitive parts" of the stream of consciousness. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 3 (June):449-477.   (Cited by 5 | Google | More links)
Hamlyn, David W. (1956). The stream of thought. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 56:63-82.   (Google)
Hannover, Bettina & Kühnen, Ulrich (2007). I-SELF: A connectionist model of the self or just a general learing model? Comment on "connectionism and self: James, Mead, and the stream of enculturated consciousness" by Kashima et al. Psychological Inquiry 18 (2):102-107.   (Google)
Haynes, John-Dylan & Rees, Geraint (2005). Predicting the stream of consciousness from activity in human visual cortex. Current Biology 15 (14):1301-7.   (Cited by 20 | Google | More links)
Ishai, Alumit (2002). Streams of consciousness. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 14 (6):832-833.   (Cited by 1 | Google | More links)
James, William (1890). The stream of thought. In William James (ed.), Principles of Psychology.   (Cited by 6 | Google)
James, William (1892). The stream of consciousness. In William. James (ed.), Psychology.   (Cited by 6 | Google)
Kaag, J. (2006). Paddling in the stream of consciousness: Describing the movement of Jamesian inquiry. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 20 (2).   (Google)
Kashima, Yoshihisa; Gurumurthy, Aparna Kanakatte; Ouschan, Lucette; Chong, Trevor & Mattingley, Jason (2007). Connectionism and self: James, Mead, and the stream of enculturated consciousness. Psychological Inquiry 18 (2):73-96.   (Cited by 2 | Google)
Kleinfeld, D. (2007). Wandering minds. Science 315 (393).   (Google)
Abstract: material on Science Online. 25. E. Salinas, T. J. Sejnowski, J. Neurosci. 20, 6193 (2000). 14. L. J. Borg-Graham, C. Monier, Y. Fregnac, Nature 393, 26. B. Haider, A. Duque, A. R. Hasenstaub, D. A. McCormick, 11 September 2006; accepted 23 November 2006
Klinger, E. (1978). Modes of normal conscious flow. In K. S. Pope & Jerome L. Singer (eds.), The Stream of Consciousness: Scientific Investigation Into the Flow of Experience. Plenum.   (Cited by 44 | Google)
Lavazza, Andrea (2007). Sense as a 'translation' of mental contents. In Antonio Chella & Riccardo Manzotti (eds.), Artificial Consciousness. Imprint Academic.   (Google)
Lloyd, Dan (2000). Beyond "the fringe": A cautionary critique of William James. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (4):629-637.   (Google)
Mangan, Bruce (2001). Sensation's ghost: The nonsensory fringe of consciousness. Psyche 7 (18).   (Cited by 36 | Google)
Abstract: Non-sensory experiences represent almost all context information in consciousness. They condition most aspects of conscious cognition including voluntary retrieval, perception, monitoring, problem solving, emotion, evaluation, meaning recognition. Many peculiar aspects of non-sensory qualia (e.g., they resist being 'grasped' by an act of attention) are explained as adaptations shaped by the cognitive functions they serve. The most important nonsensory experience is coherence or "rightness." Rightness represents degrees of context fit among contents in consciousness, and between conscious and non-conscious processes. Rightness (not familiarity) is the feeling-of-knowing in implicit cognition. The experience of rightness suggests that neural mechanisms "compute" signals indicating the global dynamics of network integration
Mason, Malia Fox (ms). In search of a default mental mode: Stimulus-independent thought, stream of consciousness, and the psychology of mindwandering.   (Google)
McGilvary, Evander Bradley (1907). The stream of consciousness. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 4 (9):225-235.   (Google | More links)
Mueller, E. T. (1990). Daydreaming in Humans and Machines: A Computer Model of the Stream of Thought. Ablex.   (Cited by 21 | Google | More links)
Murphy, Michael & White, Rhea A. (1995). In the Zone: Transcendent Experience in Sports. Penguin.   (Cited by 15 | Google)
Natsoulas, Thomas (1988). Sympathy, empathy, and the stream of consciousness. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 18 (June):169-195.   (Google | More links)
Natsoulas, Thomas (2001). The case for intrinsic theory: Incompatibilities within the stream of consciousness. Journal Of Mind And Behavior 22 (2):119-145.   (Cited by 2 | Google)
Natsoulas, Thomas (2001). The concrete state: The basic components of James's stream of consciousness. Journal Of Mind And Behavior 22 (4):427-449.   (Google)
Natsoulas, Thomas (2001). The concrete state continued. Journal of Mind and Behavior 22 (4):451-474.   (Google)
Natsoulas, Thomas (1987). The six basic concepts of consciousness and William James' stream of thought. Imagination, Cognition, and Personality 6:289-319.   (Google)
Natsoulas, Thomas (1993). The stream of consciousness: William James's specious present. Imagination, Cognition and Personality 12:367-385.   (Cited by 9 | Google)
Natsoulas, Thomas (1996). The stream of consciousness: Parts I-XVI. Imagination, Cognition, and Personality 12:3-21.   (Google)
Natsoulas, Thomas (2003). The stream of consciousness: XXVIII. Does consciousness exist? (First part). Imagination, Cognition and Personality 23 (2):121-141.   (Google)
Natsoulas, Thomas (2000). The stream of consciousness: XXII. Apprehension and the feeling aspect. Imagination, Cognition and Personality 20 (3):275-295.   (Cited by 5 | Google)
Natsoulas, Thomas (2006). The stream of consciousness: XXIX. Does consciousness exist? (Second part). Imagination, Cognition and Personality 25 (1):69-84.   (Google)
Natsoulas, Thomas (2001). The stream of consciousness: XXV. Awareness as commentary (part I). Imagination, Cognition and Personality 21 (4):347-366.   (Google)
Norman, Elisabeth (2002). Subcategories of "fringe consciousness" and their related nonconscious contexts. Psyche 8 (15):i.   (Cited by 4 | Google | More links)
Abstract: _7(18)._ http://psyche.cs.monash.edu.au/v7/psyche-7-18-mangan.html
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ABSTRACT: In Mangan's (2001) account of fringe consciousness there is a tension between the proposal that fringe
Penfield, W. (1955). The permanent record of the stream of consciousness. Acta Psychologica 11:47-69.   (Cited by 13 | Google)
Petchkovsky, L. (2000). 'Stream of consciousness' and 'ownership of thought' in indigenous people in central australia. Journal of Analytical Psychology 45 (4):577-597.   (Cited by 1 | Google | More links)
Pollio, H. R. (1990). The stream of consciousness since James. In M. Johnson & Tracy B. Henley (eds.), Reflections on "The Principles of Psychology": William James After a Century. Lawrence Erlbaum.   (Cited by 3 | Google)
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Pred, Ralph (2005). Onflow: Dynamics of Consciousness and Experience. Cambridge MA: Bradford Book/MIT Press.   (Cited by 3 | Google | More links)
Robinson, William S. (2004). Perception, affect and epiphenomenalism: Commentary on Mangan's. Psyche 10 (1).   (Google | More links)
Abstract: This commentary begins by explaining how Mangan's important work leads to a question about the relation between non-sensory experiences and perception. Reflection on affect then suggests an addition to Mangan's view that may be helpful on this and perhaps some other questions. Finally, it is argued that acceptance of non-sensory experiences is fully compatible with epiphenomenalism
Rychlak, Joseph F. (1978). The stream of consciousness: Implications for a humanistic psychological theory. In K. S. Pope & Jerome L. Singer (eds.), The Stream of Consciousness: Scientific Investigation Into the Flow of Experience. Plenum.   (Google)
Schuetz, Alfred (1940). William James's concept of the stream of thought, phenomenologically interpreted. Journal of Philosophy 37:673-74.   (Google)
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Singer, Jerome L. (1998). Daydreams, the stream of consciousness, and self-representations. In Robert F. Bornstein & Joseph M. Masling (eds.), Empirical Perspectives on the Psychoanalytic Unconscious. American Psychological Association.   (Google)
Singer, Jerome L. (1978). Experimental studies of daydreaming and the stream of thought. In K. S. Pope & Jerome L. Singer (eds.), The Stream of Consciousness: Scientific Investigation Into the Flow of Experience. Plenum.   (Cited by 19 | Google)
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Soteriou, Matthew (2007). Content and the stream of consciousness. Philosophical Perspectives 21 (1):543–568.   (Google | More links)
Spivey, Michael & Cargill, Sarah (2007). Toward a continuity of consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (1):216-233.   (Google)
Abstract: Real-time cognition is continuous in time and contiguous in mental state space. This temporal continuity implies that the majority of mental life is spent in states that are partially consistent with multiple representations. The state-space contiguity implies that different cognitive processes interact in ways that make them quite non-modular. As the evidence for such information-permeability expands to include not just neural subsystems but also the entire brain and even the entire organism, this radical interactionism leads one to hypothesize that mental activity, and perhaps consciousness itself, is something that emerges amid the interface between one's body and one's environment. We portray mental activity as a continuous trajectory through a brain-body-environment state space, where close visitations with labelled attractors may constitute reportable self- consciousness and traversals through unlabeled regions may constitute unutterable immediate conscious awareness
Stamenov, Maxim I. (2002). On focus and fringe in explicit mental processing. In Kunio Yasue, Marj Jibu & Tarcisio Della Senta (eds.), No Matter, Never Mind. John Benjamins.   (Google)
Steels, Luc (2003). Language re-entrance and the 'inner voice'. In Owen Holland (ed.), Machine Consciousness. Imprint Academic.   (Cited by 8 | Google | More links)
Strange, J. R. (1978). A search for the sources of the stream of consciousness. In K. S. Pope & Jerome L. Singer (eds.), The Stream of Consciousness: Scientific Investigation Into the Flow of Experience. Plenum.   (Google)